Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/26865
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dc.contributor.authorDobbie, Fionaen_UK
dc.contributor.authorMacKintosh, Anne Marieen_UK
dc.contributor.authorClegg, Garethen_UK
dc.contributor.authorStirzaker, Rebeccaen_UK
dc.contributor.authorBauld, Lindaen_UK
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-06T23:55:06Z-
dc.date.available2018-04-06T23:55:06Z-
dc.date.issued2018-03-07en_UK
dc.identifier.othere0193391en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/26865-
dc.description.abstractSurvival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) varies across the developed world. Although not all OHCA are recoverable, the survival rate in Scotland is lower than in comparable countries, with higher average survival rates of 7.9% in England and 9% across Europe. The purpose of this paper is to explore the barriers, facilitators and public attitudes to administering bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) which could inform future policy and initiatives to improve the rate of bystander CPR. Data was collected via a cross-sectional general population survey of 1027 adults in Scotland. 52% of respondents had been trained in CPR. Of those who were not trained, two fifths (42%) expressed a willingness to receive CPR training. Fewer than half (49%) felt confident administering CPR, rising to 82% if they were talked through it by a call handler. Multivariate analyses identified that people in social grade C2DE were less likely than those in social grade ABC1 to be CPR trained and less confident to administer CPR if talked through by a call handler. The older a person was, the less likely they were to be CPR trained, show willingness to be CPR trained or be confident to administer bystander CPR with or without instruction from an emergency call handler. These findings are particularly relevant considering that most OHCA happen in the homes of older people. In a developed country such as Scotland with widely available CPR training, only half of the adult population reported feeling confident about administering bystander CPR. Further efforts tailored specifically for people who are older, unemployed and have a lower social grade are required to increase knowledge, confidence and uptake of training in bystander CPR.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherPublic Library of Scienceen_UK
dc.relationDobbie F, MacKintosh AM, Clegg G, Stirzaker R & Bauld L (2018) Attitudes towards bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Results from a cross-sectional general population survey, PLoS ONE, 13 (3), Art. No.: e0193391. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0193391.en_UK
dc.rights© 2018 Dobbie et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_UK
dc.titleAttitudes towards bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Results from a cross-sectional general population surveyen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0193391en_UK
dc.identifier.pmid29513722en_UK
dc.citation.jtitlePLoS ONEen_UK
dc.citation.issn1932-6203en_UK
dc.citation.volume13en_UK
dc.citation.issue3en_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublisheden_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusVoR - Version of Recorden_UK
dc.contributor.funderResuscitation Research Group, University of Edinburghen_UK
dc.citation.date07/03/2018en_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationInstitute for Social Marketingen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationInstitute for Social Marketingen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Edinburghen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationHeriot-Watt Universityen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationInstitute for Social Marketingen_UK
dc.identifier.isi000426896800056en_UK
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-85043346897en_UK
dc.identifier.wtid495116en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-8294-8203en_UK
dc.date.accepted2018-02-11en_UK
dc.date.firstcompliantdepositdate2018-03-26en_UK
dc.description.refREF Compliant by Deposit in Stirling's Repositoryen_UK
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles

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