Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/26496
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorForbat, Lizen_UK
dc.contributor.authorSayer, Charlotteen_UK
dc.contributor.authorMcNamee, Philipen_UK
dc.contributor.authorMenson, Esseen_UK
dc.contributor.authorBarclay, Sarahen_UK
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-15T23:23:55Z-
dc.date.available2018-05-15T23:23:55Z-
dc.date.issued2016-01-01en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/26496-
dc.description.abstractBackground Conflict in healthcare is a well-recognised but under-examined phenomenon. Little is known about the prevalence and causes of conflict across paediatric specialties.  Objective To report the frequency and characteristics of conflict in a paediatric hospital.  Design and setting An explanatory sequential mixed-method approach was adopted. A bespoke questionnaire recorded frequency, severity, cause and staff involved in conflict prospectively. Data were recorded for the same two 12-week periods in 2013 and 2014, in one UK children's teaching hospital. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and correlation, the findings of which informed the construction of a semistructured interview schedule. Qualitative interviews were conducted with six key informant healthcare professionals to aid data interpretation; interviews were analysed thematically.  Results 136 individual episodes of conflict were reported. The three most common causes were ‘communication breakdown’, ‘disagreements about treatment’ and ‘unrealistic expectations’. Over 448 h of healthcare professional time was taken up by these conflicts; most often staff nurses, consultants, doctors in training and matrons. The mean severity rating was 4.9 out of 10. Qualitative interviews revealed consensus regarding whether conflicts were ranked as low, medium or high severity, and explanations regarding why neurology recorded the highest number of conflicts in the observed period.  Conclusions Conflict is prevalent across paediatric specialties, and particularly in neurology, general paediatrics and neonatology. Considerable staff time is taken in managing conflict, indicating a need to focus resources on supporting staff to resolve conflict, notably managing communication breakdown.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group Ltden_UK
dc.relationForbat L, Sayer C, McNamee P, Menson E & Barclay S (2016) Conflict in a paediatric hospital: a prospective mixed-method study. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 101 (1), pp. 23-27. https://doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2015-308814en_UK
dc.rightsThis is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en_UK
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en_UK
dc.titleConflict in a paediatric hospital: a prospective mixed-method studyen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/archdischild-2015-308814en_UK
dc.identifier.pmid26553912en_UK
dc.citation.jtitleArchives of Disease in Childhooden_UK
dc.citation.issn1468-2044en_UK
dc.citation.issn0003-9888en_UK
dc.citation.volume101en_UK
dc.citation.issue1en_UK
dc.citation.spage23en_UK
dc.citation.epage27en_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublisheden_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusVoR - Version of Recorden_UK
dc.citation.date09/11/2015en_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationFaculty of Social Sciencesen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationEvelina Children's Hospital, Londonen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationHealth Sciences Research - Stirling - LEGACYen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationEvelina Children's Hospital, Londonen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationMedical Mediation Foundationen_UK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000367464100008en_UK
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-84952038067en_UK
dc.identifier.wtid897451en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-7218-5775en_UK
dc.date.accepted2015-08-09en_UK
dc.date.filedepositdate2018-01-11en_UK
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
23.full.pdfFulltext - Published Version472.75 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


This item is protected by original copyright



A file in this item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons

Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.