Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/26160
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Social Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Perceptions of stigma among people affected by early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease
Author(s): Ashworth, Rosalie
Keywords: Alzheimer’s
dementia
early onset
late onset
socioemotional selectivity theory
stigma
Issue Date: 1-Mar-2020
Citation: Ashworth R (2020) Perceptions of stigma among people affected by early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Journal of Health Psychology, 25 (4), pp. 490-510. https://doi.org/10.1177/1359105317720818
Abstract: The aim of this research was to explore perceptions of stigma among people with early- and late-onset Alzheimer’s disease and those who support them, using questionnaires (n = 44) and semi-structured interviews (n = 14). Perceived stigma reporting was low in the questionnaires, whereas interviews revealed higher levels of perceived stigma in the form of unpredictable reactions to diagnosis, feeling stupid and ignorance of the condition among the public. Perceived stigma was managed in similar ways across age groups, focusing on ‘being the lucky ones’. Results support the need to further tackle stigma and challenge expectations, particularly given the drive to diagnose people and thereby expose them to stigma.
DOI Link: 10.1177/1359105317720818
Rights: Ashworth R, Perceptions of stigma among people affected by early- and late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Journal of Health Psychology, 25 (4), pp. 490-510. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Reprinted by permission of SAGE Publications. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/1359105317720818
Licence URL(s): https://storre.stir.ac.uk/STORREEndUserLicence.pdf

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