Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/24936
Appears in Collections:Communications, Media and Culture Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Hiding in Plain Sight: Gender, Sexism & Press Coverage of the Jimmy Savile Case
Author(s): Boyle, Karen
Contact Email: karen.boyle@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Jimmy Savile
news
journalism
gender
child sexual abuse
gender-based violence
Issue Date: 31-Dec-2018
Citation: Boyle K (2018) Hiding in Plain Sight: Gender, Sexism & Press Coverage of the Jimmy Savile Case. Journalism Studies, 19 (11), pp. 1562-1578. https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670X.2017.1282832.
Abstract: In 2012 – less than 12 months after his death – TV personality Jimmy Savile was revealed to have been a prolific sexual abuser of children and young adults, mainly girls and women. This study advances research on the gendering of violence in news discourse by examining press coverage in the period leading up to Savile’s unmasking. It investigates the conditions in which Savile’s predatory behaviour – widely acknowledged in his lifetime – finally became recast as (child sexual) abuse. Specifically, it challenges the gender-blind analyses of media coverage which have typified academic responses to date, arguing that Savile’s crimes – and the reporting of them – need to be understood in the broader context of everyday sexism: a contemporary, as well as an historic, issue.
DOI Link: 10.1080/1461670X.2017.1282832
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Journalism Studies on 03 Feb 2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/1461670X.2017.1282832

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