Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/24688
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dc.contributor.authorStead, Martine-
dc.contributor.authorMacKintosh, Anne Marie-
dc.contributor.authorFindlay, Anne-
dc.contributor.authorSparks, Leigh-
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Annie S-
dc.contributor.authorBarton, Karen L-
dc.contributor.authorEadie, Douglas-
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-15T01:22:24Z-
dc.date.issued2017-08-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/24688-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Price promotions are a promising intervention for encouraging healthier food purchasing. We aimed to assess the impact of a targeted direct marketing price promotion combined with healthy eating advice and recipe suggestions on the purchase of selected healthier foods by low income consumers.  Methods: We conducted a randomised controlled trial (n = 53 367) of a direct marketing price promotion (Buywell) combined with healthy eating advice and recipe suggestions for low income consumers identified as ‘less healthy’ shoppers. Impact was assessed using electronic point of sale data for UK low income shoppers before, during and after the promotion.  Results: The proportion of customers buying promoted products in the intervention month increased by between 1.4% and 2.8% for four of the five products. There was significantly higher uptake in the promotion month (P < 0.001) for the intervention group than would have been expected on the basis of average uptake in the other months. When product switching was examined for semi-skimmed/skimmed milk, a modest increase (1%) was found in the intervention month of customers switching from full-fat to low-fat milk. This represented 8% of customers who previously bought only full-fat milk. The effects were generally not sustained after the promotion period.  Conclusions: Short-term direct marketing price promotions combined with healthy eating advice and recipe suggestions targeted at low income consumers are feasible and can have a modest impact on short-term food-purchasing behaviour, although further approaches are needed to help sustain these changes.en_UK
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell for The British Dietetic Association Ltd.-
dc.relationStead M, MacKintosh AM, Findlay A, Sparks L, Anderson AS, Barton KL & Eadie D (2017) Impact of a targeted direct marketing price promotion intervention (Buywell) on food-purchasing behaviour by low income consumers: a randomised controlled trial, Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 30 (4), pp. 524-533.-
dc.rightsThis item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Stead M., MacKintosh A.M., Findlay A., Sparks L., Anderson A.S., Barton K. & Eadie D. (2017) Impact of a targeted direct marketing price promotion intervention (Buywell) on food-purchasing behaviour by low income consumers: a randomised controlled trial. J Hum Nutr Diet. 30, 524–533, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/jhn.12441. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.-
dc.subjecthealth inequalitiesen_UK
dc.subjectmarketingen_UK
dc.subjectnutritionen_UK
dc.subjectpromotionen_UK
dc.subjectpublic healthen_UK
dc.titleImpact of a targeted direct marketing price promotion intervention (Buywell) on food-purchasing behaviour by low income consumers: a randomised controlled trialen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.rights.embargodate2018-02-16T00:00:00Z-
dc.rights.embargoreasonPublisher requires embargo of 12 months after formal publication.-
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jhn.12441-
dc.identifier.pmid28211112-
dc.citation.jtitleJournal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics-
dc.citation.issn0952-3871-
dc.citation.volume30-
dc.citation.issue4-
dc.citation.spage524-
dc.citation.epage533-
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublished-
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereed-
dc.type.statusPost-print (author final draft post-refereeing)-
dc.author.emailmartine.stead@stir.ac.uk-
dc.citation.date17/02/2017-
dc.contributor.affiliationInstitute for Social Marketing-
dc.contributor.affiliationInstitute for Social Marketing-
dc.contributor.affiliationMarketing and Retail Division-
dc.contributor.affiliationMarketing and Retail Division-
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Dundee-
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Dundee-
dc.contributor.affiliationInstitute for Social Marketing-
dc.rights.embargoterms2018-02-17-
dc.rights.embargoliftdate2018-02-17-
dc.identifier.isi000405385800012-
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles

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