Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/24655
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Kelsey Jackson-
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-06T22:53:02Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/24655-
dc.description.abstractAntiquarianism, the early modern study of the past, occupies a central role in modern studies of humanist and post-humanist scholarship. Its relationship to modern disciplines such as archaeology is widely acknowledged, and at least some antiquaries— such as John Aubrey, William Camden, and William Dugdale—are well-known to Anglophone historians. But what was antiquarianism and how can twenty-first century scholars begin to make sense of it? To answer these questions, the article begins with a survey of recent scholarship, outlining how our understanding of antiquarianism has developed since the ground-breaking work of Arnaldo Momigliano in the midtwentieth century. It then explores the definition and scope of antiquarian practice through close attention to contemporaneous accounts and actors’ categories before turning to three case-studies of antiquaries in Denmark, Scotland, and England. By way of conclusion, it develops a series of propositions for reassessing our understanding of antiquarianism. It reaffirms antiquarianism’s central role in the learned culture of the early modern world and offers suggestions for avenues which might be taken in future research on the discipline.en_UK
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherBrill-
dc.relationWilliams KJ (2017) Antiquarianism: A Reinterpretation, Erudition and the Republic of Letters, 2 (1), pp. 56-96.-
dc.rightsThis item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Publisher allows this work to be made available in this repository. Published in Erudition and the Republic of Letters by Brill with the following policy:Authors of articles published by Brill are permitted to self-archive the accepted (peer-reviewed) version after an embargo period of 24 months-
dc.subjectantiquarianismen_UK
dc.subjectantiquariesen_UK
dc.subjecthumanismen_UK
dc.subjecthistoriographyen_UK
dc.subjecthistory of scholarship.en_UK
dc.titleAntiquarianism: A Reinterpretationen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.rights.embargodate2018-12-31T00:00:00Z-
dc.rights.embargoreasonPublisher requires embargo of 24 months after formal publication.-
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1163/24055069-00201002-
dc.citation.jtitleErudition and the Republic of Letters-
dc.citation.issn2405-5050-
dc.citation.volume2-
dc.citation.issue1-
dc.citation.spage56-
dc.citation.epage96-
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublished-
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereed-
dc.type.statusPost-print (author final draft post-refereeing)-
dc.author.emailk.j.williams@stir.ac.uk-
dc.citation.date01/2017-
dc.contributor.affiliationEnglish Studies-
dc.rights.embargoterms2019-01-01-
dc.rights.embargoliftdate2019-01-01-
Appears in Collections:Literature and Languages Journal Articles

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Antiquarianism Survey AAM.pdf384.58 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.