Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22904
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dc.contributor.authorClose, Graeme L-
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, David Lee-
dc.contributor.authorPhilp, Andrew-
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Louise M-
dc.contributor.authorMorton, James P-
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-20T03:36:51Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/22904-
dc.description.abstractDespite over 50 years of research, the field of sports nutrition continues to grow at a rapid rate. Whilst the traditional research focus was one that centred on strategies to maximise competition performance, emerging data in the last decade has demonstrated how both macronutrient and micronutrient availability can play a prominent role in regulating those cell signalling pathways that modulate skeletal muscle adaptations to endurance and resistance training. Nonetheless, in the context of exercise performance, it is clear that carbohydrate (but not fat) still remains king and that carefully chosen ergogenic aids (e.g. caffeine, creatine, sodium bicarbonate, beta-alanine, nitrates) can all promote performance in the correct exercise setting. In relation to exercise training, however, it is now thought that strategic periods of reduced carbohydrate and elevated dietary protein intake may enhance training adaptations whereas high carbohydrate availability and antioxidant supplementation may actually attenuate training adaptation. Emerging evidence also suggests that vitamin D may play a regulatory role in muscle regeneration and subsequent hypertrophy following damaging forms of exercise. Finally, novel compounds (albeit largely examined in rodent models) such as epicatechins, nicotinamide riboside, resveratrol, β-hydroxy β-methylbutyrate, phosphatidic acid and ursolic acid may also promote or attenuate skeletal muscle adaptations to endurance and strength training. When taken together, it is clear that sports nutrition is very much at the heart of the Olympic motto,Citius, Altius, Fortius (faster, higher, stronger).en_UK
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherElsevier-
dc.relationClose GL, Hamilton DL, Philp A, Burke LM & Morton JP (2016) New Strategies in Sport Nutrition to Increase Exercise Performance, Free Radical Biology and Medicine, 98, pp. 144-158.-
dc.rightsThe publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.-
dc.titleNew Strategies in Sport Nutrition to Increase Exercise Performanceen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.rights.embargodate2999-12-31T00:00:00Z-
dc.rights.embargoreasonThe publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository therefore there is an embargo on the full text of the work.-
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2016.01.016-
dc.identifier.pmid26855422-
dc.citation.jtitleFree Radical Biology and Medicine-
dc.citation.issn0891-5849-
dc.citation.volume98-
dc.citation.spage144-
dc.citation.epage158-
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublished-
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereed-
dc.type.statusPublisher version (final published refereed version)-
dc.author.emaild.l.hamilton@stir.ac.uk-
dc.citation.date05/02/2016-
dc.contributor.affiliationLiverpool John Moores University-
dc.contributor.affiliationSport-
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Birmingham-
dc.contributor.affiliationAustralian Institute of Sport-
dc.contributor.affiliationLiverpool John Moores University-
dc.rights.embargoterms2999-12-31-
dc.rights.embargoliftdate2999-12-31-
dc.identifier.isi000382213400015-
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles

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