Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22725
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dc.contributor.authorFrank, John Wen_UK
dc.contributor.authorBromley, Catherineen_UK
dc.contributor.authorDoi, Lawrenceen_UK
dc.contributor.authorEstrade, Michelleen_UK
dc.contributor.authorJepson, Ruthen_UK
dc.contributor.authorMcAteer, Johnen_UK
dc.contributor.authorRobertson, Tonyen_UK
dc.contributor.authorTreanor, Moragen_UK
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Andrewen_UK
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-08T23:37:02Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-08T23:37:02Z-
dc.date.issued2015-09en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/22725-
dc.description.abstractWhile widespread lip service is given in the UK to the social determinants of health (SDoH), there are few published comparisons of how the UK's devolved jurisdictions ‘stack up’, in terms of implementing SDoH-based policies and programmes, to improve health equity over the life-course. Based on recent SDoH publications, seven key societal-level investments are suggested, across the life-course, for increasing health equity by socioeconomic position (SEP). We present hard-to-find comparable analyses of routinely collected data to gauge the relative extent to which these investments have been pursued and achieved expected goals in Scotland, as compared with England and Wales, in recent decades. Despite Scotland’s longstanding explicit goal of reducing health inequalities, it has recently been doing slightly better than England and Wales on only one broad indicator of health-equity-related investments: childhood poverty. However, on the following indicators of other ‘best investments for health equity’, Scotland has not achieved demonstrably more equitable outcomes by SEP than the rest of the UK: infant mortality and teenage pregnancy rates; early childhood education implementation; standardised educational attainment after primary/secondary school; healthcare system access and performance; protection of the population from potentially hazardous patterns of food, drink and gambling use; unemployment. Although Scotland did not choose independence on September 18th, 2014, it could still (under the planned increased devolution of powers from Westminster) choose to increase investments in the underperforming categories of interventions for health equity listed above. However, such discussion is largely absent from the current post-referendum debate. Without further significant investments in such policies and programmes, Scotland is unlikely to achieve the ‘healthier, fairer society’ referred to in the current Scottish Government's official aspirations for the nation.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherElsevieren_UK
dc.relationFrank JW, Bromley C, Doi L, Estrade M, Jepson R, McAteer J, Robertson T, Treanor M & Williams A (2015) Seven Key Investments for Health Equity across the Lifecourse: Scotland versus the rest of the UK. Social Science and Medicine, 140, pp. 136-146. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2015.07.007en_UK
dc.rightsThis article is open-access under a Creative Commons license. Proper attribution of authorship and correct citation details should be given.en_UK
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_UK
dc.subjectEngland and Walesen_UK
dc.subjectLifecourse Epidemiologyen_UK
dc.subjectPolicies to Reduce Health Inequalitiesen_UK
dc.subjectPublic Healthen_UK
dc.subjectScotlanden_UK
dc.subjectUnited Kingdomen_UK
dc.titleSeven Key Investments for Health Equity across the Lifecourse: Scotland versus the rest of the UKen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.socscimed.2015.07.007en_UK
dc.identifier.pmid26225753en_UK
dc.citation.jtitleSocial Science and Medicineen_UK
dc.citation.issn0277-9536en_UK
dc.citation.issn0277-9536en_UK
dc.citation.volume140en_UK
dc.citation.spage136en_UK
dc.citation.epage146en_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublisheden_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusVoR - Version of Recorden_UK
dc.contributor.funderMedical Research Councilen_UK
dc.contributor.funderChief Scientist Office of Scotlanden_UK
dc.author.emailtony.robertson@stir.ac.uken_UK
dc.citation.date18/07/2015en_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Edinburghen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Edinburghen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Edinburghen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Edinburghen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationScottish Collaboration for Public Health Research & Policyen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Edinburghen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationHS - Management and Support - LEGACYen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationSociology, Social Policy & Criminologyen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Edinburghen_UK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000360253600015en_UK
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-84938082057en_UK
dc.identifier.wtid580670en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-9446-445Xen_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-1962-5874en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0003-4377-4092en_UK
dc.date.accepted2015-07-08en_UK
dc.date.filedepositdate2016-01-14en_UK
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles

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