Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22455
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dc.contributor.authorGoodger, Kate-
dc.contributor.authorLavallee, David-
dc.contributor.authorGorely, Trish-
dc.contributor.authorHarwood, Chris-
dc.contributor.editorWilliams, JM-
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-17T08:51:15Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/22455-
dc.description.abstractFirst paragraph: Burnout as an academic construct within the field of sport psychology, and burnout framed in the anecdotal accounts of athletes, coaches, parents, athletic directors, and trainers, appears to present two very different situations in terms of familiarity and understanding. Sport psychology journal articles and book chapters on the topic explain that there is a paucity of research in the field (Dale & Weinberg, 1990; Fender, 1989; Gould, Tuffey, Udry, & Loehr, 1996a), and that this limited empirical base has resulted in the concept being little understood as an applied area (Raedeke, Lunney, & Venables, 2002). In contrast, burnout as a lay term used by members of the sport community has experienced widespread colloquial use and been greeted with enormous public appeal. In the 1990s, it was described as a “hot” topic (Gould et al., 1996a), a “buzzword” within this environment (Raedeke, 1997), and significant media attention followed—and continues today. In turn, the latter has served to further popularize it among the wider public. Burnout, thus, has become a term used in everyday language by both members of the sport community (Vealey, Armstrong, Comar, & Greenleaf, 1998) and sports fans alike and, as such, appears as a concept that is readily understood and observable in day-to-day practice.en_UK
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherMcGraw Hill-
dc.relationGoodger K, Lavallee D, Gorely T & Harwood C (2010) Burnout in Sport: Understanding the Process—From Early Warning Signs to Individualized Intervention. In: Williams JM (ed.). Applied sport psychology: Personal growth to peak performance , 6th ed, Columbus, OH (USA): McGraw Hill, pp. 492-511.-
dc.rightsThe publisher has not yet responded to our queries therefore this work cannot be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.-
dc.titleBurnout in Sport: Understanding the Process—From Early Warning Signs to Individualized Interventionen_UK
dc.typePart of book or chapter of booken_UK
dc.rights.embargodate2999-12-31T00:00:00Z-
dc.rights.embargoreasonThe publisher has not yet responded to our queries. This work cannot be made publicly available in this Repository therefore there is an embargo on the full text of the work.-
dc.citation.spage492-
dc.citation.epage511-
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublished-
dc.type.statusBook Chapter: author post-print (pre-copy editing)-
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.mhprofessional.com/product.php?isbn=0073376531-
dc.author.emaildavid.lavallee@stir.ac.uk-
dc.citation.btitleApplied sport psychology: Personal growth to peak performance-
dc.citation.isbn978-0-07-337653-0-
dc.publisher.addressColumbus, OH (USA)-
dc.contributor.affiliationLoughborough University-
dc.contributor.affiliationSport-
dc.contributor.affiliationSport-
dc.contributor.affiliationLoughborough University-
dc.rights.embargoterms2999-12-31-
dc.rights.embargoliftdate2999-12-31-
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Book Chapters and Sections

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