Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/20178
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dc.contributor.authorKyle, Richard Gen_UK
dc.contributor.authorMacmillan, Ionaen_UK
dc.contributor.authorForbat, Lizen_UK
dc.contributor.authorNeal, Richard Den_UK
dc.contributor.authorO'Carroll, Ronanen_UK
dc.contributor.authorHaw, Sallyen_UK
dc.contributor.authorHubbard, Gillen_UK
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-10T23:26:58Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-10T23:26:58Z-
dc.date.issued2014-05en_UK
dc.identifier.othere005137en_UK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/20178-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To describe Scottish adolescents’ sun-related behaviours and tanning attitudes and assess associations with skin cancer awareness.  Design: Cross-sectional study.  Setting: 20 state secondary schools in one Scottish local authority (Glasgow City). Participants: 2173 adolescents (females: 50.7%, n=1102) with a mean age of 12.4 (SD=0.55). Outcome measures: Sun-related behaviour (suntan, sunbathing, sunburn, sunscreen use, sunbed use), tanning attitudes, skin cancer-related symptom and risk factor awareness. Results: Adolescents reported poor sun-related practice: 51% of adolescents reported sunburn the previous summer of whom 38% indicated sunburn on more than one occasion. Skin cancer awareness was low: 45% recognised ‘change in the appearance of a mole’ as a cancer symptom, and 39% agreed that ‘getting sunburnt more than once as a child’ increased cancer risk. 42% and 26% of adolescents, respectively, reported that friends and family held protanning attitudes. Compared with males, females were statistically significantly more likely to: report sunbathing (p<0.001), use of lotions or oil to aid tanning (p=0.009) and sunburn (p<0.001); know that changes in the appearance of a mole was a skin cancer symptom (p=0.036) and sunburn more than once as a child was a skin cancer risk factor (p=0.005); perceive their friends to hold protanning attitudes (p<0.001) and indicate that a tan made them feel better about themselves (p<0.001), more attractive to others (p=0.011) and healthier (p<0.001).  Conclusions: Scottish adolescents had poor sun protection practice and low skin cancer awareness. Girls adopted riskier sun-related behaviour despite greater awareness of skin cancer-related risk. Urgent action is required to promote positive sun-related behaviour and increase skin cancer awareness among Scottish adolescents. However, further research is needed to inform the development of effective sun-safe interventions.en_UK
dc.language.isoenen_UK
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen_UK
dc.relationKyle RG, Macmillan I, Forbat L, Neal RD, O'Carroll R, Haw S & Hubbard G (2014) Scottish adolescents’ sun-related behaviours, tanning attitudes and associations with skin cancer awareness: a cross-sectional study, BMJ Open, 4 (5), Art. No.: e005137. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005137.en_UK
dc.relationEvaluation of Teenage Cancer Trust education intervention funded by the Detect Cancer Early Campaignen_UK
dc.relationletter dated 12/03/2013en_UK
dc.rightsThis is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 3.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/en_UK
dc.titleScottish adolescents’ sun-related behaviours, tanning attitudes and associations with skin cancer awareness: a cross-sectional studyen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005137en_UK
dc.citation.jtitleBMJ Openen_UK
dc.citation.issn2044-6055en_UK
dc.citation.volume4en_UK
dc.citation.issue5en_UK
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublisheden_UK
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereeden_UK
dc.type.statusVoR - Version of Recorden_UK
dc.contributor.funderTeenage Cancer Trusten_UK
dc.author.emailrichard.kyle@stir.ac.uken_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationHealth Sciences Health - Highland - LEGACYen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationTeenage Cancer Trusten_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationHealth Sciences Research - Stirling - LEGACYen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationBangor Universityen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationPsychologyen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationHealth Sciences Research - Stirling - LEGACYen_UK
dc.contributor.affiliationHealth Sciences Research - Highland - LEGACYen_UK
dc.identifier.isi000336976900043en_UK
dc.identifier.scopusid2-s2.0-84899751064en_UK
dc.identifier.wtid630906en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-7218-5775en_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0002-5130-291Xen_UK
dc.contributor.orcid0000-0003-2165-5770en_UK
dc.date.firstcompliantdepositdate2014-05-13en_UK
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles

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