Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/2008
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorLaw, Robin-
dc.contributor.authorReid, John-
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-01T16:37:08Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-01T16:37:08Z-
dc.date.issued1986-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/2008-
dc.description.abstractFew exploratory ventures would ever be undertaken if the explorer appreciated his own limitations at the outset. Although his ultimate destination is unclear, the route uncertain, the terrain unfamiliar and the tools inadequate he is spurred initially by a self-assurance born of his own limited knowledge. Unfortunately, that same self-assurance ill-equips him for the difficulties which he inevitably has to face en route. This thesis has been no exception to this pattern. It has involved more than its fair share of blind alleys, false trails, disorientation, retracing of footsteps and re-establishment of bearings. It has occasionally been marked by that feeling of despairing bewilderment which confronts the uncertain traveller lost in unfamiliar territory or overwhelmed by the novelty and complexity of his surroundings. Like most exploratory journeys, it has been difficult to decide when the ultimate destination has been reached and almost impossible in restrospect to recall the exact route by which that particular point was achieved. However, the historian of Dahomey is fortunate in comparison with the explorer venturing into virgin territory. For he is well served by the pioneers who have blazed the trail before him and by the signposts which are available to him. The Kingdom of Dahomey has been well covered by primary source material and contemporary documentation and publications.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Stirlingen
dc.subject.lcshSlave trade Benin Historyen
dc.subject.lcshBenin Economic conditionsen
dc.subject.lcshBenin Foreign economic relationsen
dc.subject.lcshBenin Colonial influences Historyen
dc.titleWarrior aristocrats in crisis: the political effects of the transition from the slave trade to palm oil commerce in the nineteenth century Kingdom of Dahomeyen
dc.typeThesis or Dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.type.qualificationnameDoctor of Philosophyen
dc.contributor.affiliationSchool of Arts and Humanities-
dc.contributor.affiliationHistory and Politics-
Appears in Collections:History and Politics eTheses

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
warrior aristocrats in crisis.pdf43.26 MBAdobe PDFView/Open


This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.