Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/16430
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dc.contributor.authorJones, Jenny-
dc.contributor.authorThomson, Patricia-
dc.contributor.authorLauder, William-
dc.contributor.authorLeslie, Stephen-
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-10T01:48:58Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-10T01:48:58Z-
dc.date.issued2013-03-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/16430-
dc.description.abstractReflexology is a complex massage intervention, based on the concept that specific areas of the feet (reflex points) correspond to individual internal organs within the body. Reflexologists trained in the popular Ingham reflexology method claim that massage to these points, using massage techniques unique to reflexology, stimulates an increase in blood supply to the corresponding organ. Reflexology researchers face two key methodological challenges that need to be addressed if a specific treatment-related hemodynamic effect is to be scientifically demonstrated. The first is the problem of inconsistent reflexology foot maps; the second is the issue of poor experimental controls. This article proposes a potential experimental solution that we believe can address both methodological challenges and in doing so, allow any specific hemodynamic treatment effect unique to reflexology to experimentally reveal itself.en_UK
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc-
dc.relationJones J, Thomson P, Lauder W & Leslie S (2013) A proposed reductionist solution to address the methodological challenges of inconsistent reflexology maps and poor experimental controls in reflexology research: A discussion paper, Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, 19 (3), pp. 232-234.-
dc.rightsThis is a copy of an article published in the The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine © 2013 copyright Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.; The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine is available online at: http://online.liebertpub.com-
dc.titleA proposed reductionist solution to address the methodological challenges of inconsistent reflexology maps and poor experimental controls in reflexology research: A discussion paperen_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1089/acm.2012.0022-
dc.citation.jtitleJournal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine-
dc.citation.issn1075-5535-
dc.citation.volume19-
dc.citation.issue3-
dc.citation.spage232-
dc.citation.epage234-
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublished-
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereed-
dc.type.statusPublisher version (final published refereed version)-
dc.author.emailjenny.jones@stir.ac.uk-
dc.contributor.affiliationHealth Sciences Highland-
dc.contributor.affiliationHS Research - Stirling-
dc.contributor.affiliationHS Research - Stirling-
dc.contributor.affiliationNHS Highland-
dc.identifier.isi000316464200008-
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles



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