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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/108

Appears in Collections:Computing Science and Mathematics eTheses
Title: Combining MAS and P2P Systems: The Agent Trees Multi-Agent System (ATMAS)
Author(s): Gill, Martin L.
Supervisor(s): Smith, Leslie S.
Jones, Simon
Keywords: P2P
MAS
Agent
Multi-Agent System
Peer
AT-MAS
Tree
Peer-2-peer
Issue Date: Oct-2005
Publisher: University of Stirling
Abstract: The seamless retrieval of information distributed across networks has been one of the key goals of many systems. Early solutions involved the use of single static agents which would retrieve the unfiltered data and then process it. However, this was deemed costly and inefficient in terms of the bandwidth since complete files need to be downloaded when only a single value is often all that is required. As a result, mobile agents were developed to filter the data in situ before returning it to the user. However, mobile agents have their own associated problems, namely security and control. The Agent Trees Multi-Agent System (AT-MAS) has been developed to provide the remote processing and filtering capabilities but without the need for mobile code. It is implemented as a Peer to Peer (P2P) network of static intelligent cooperating agents, each of which control one or more data sources. This dissertation describes the two key technologies have directly influenced the design of ATMAS, Peer-to-Peer (P2P) systems and Multi-Agent Systems (MAS). P2P systems are conceptually simple, but limited in power, whereas MAS are significantly more complex but correspondingly more powerful. The resulting system exhibits the power of traditional MAS systems while retaining the simplicity of P2P systems. The dissertation describes the system in detail and analyses its performance.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/108
Affiliation: School of Natural Sciences
Computing Science and Mathematics

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