Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/10180
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dc.contributor.authorHoddinott, Pat-
dc.contributor.authorBritten, Jane-
dc.contributor.authorHarrild, Kirsten-
dc.contributor.authorGodden, David J-
dc.date.accessioned2014-09-13T14:03:28Z-
dc.date.issued2007-05-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/10180-
dc.description.abstractCluster randomised controlled trials for health promotion, education, public health or organisational change interventions are becoming increasingly common to inform evidence-based policy. However, there is little published methodological evidence on recruitment strategies for primary care population clusters. In this paper, we discuss how choosing which population cluster to randomise can impact on the practicalities of recruitment in primary care. We describe strategies developed through our experiences of recruiting primary care organisations to participate in a national randomised controlled trial of a policy to provide community breastfeeding groups for pregnant and breastfeeding mothers, the BIG (Breastfeeding in Groups) trial. We propose an iterative qualitative approach to recruitment; collecting data generated through the recruitment process, identifying themes and using the constant comparative method of analysis. This can assist in developing successful recruitment strategies and contrasts with the standardised approach commonly used when recruiting individuals to participate in randomised controlled trials. Recruiting primary care population clusters to participate in trials is currently an uphill battle in Britain. It is a complex process, which can benefit from applying qualitative methods to inform trial design and recruitment strategy. Recruitment could be facilitated if health service managers were committed to supporting peer reviewed, funded and ethics committee approved research at national level.en_UK
dc.language.isoen-
dc.publisherElsevier-
dc.relationHoddinott P, Britten J, Harrild K & Godden DJ (2007) Recruitment issues when primary care population clusters are used in randomised controlled clinical trials: Climbing mountains or pushing boulders uphill?, Contemporary Clinical Trials, 28 (3), pp. 232-241.-
dc.rightsThe publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.-
dc.subjectrecruitmenten_UK
dc.subjectcluster randomised controlled trialsen_UK
dc.subjectprimary careen_UK
dc.subjectpublic healthen_UK
dc.subjectqualitative methodsen_UK
dc.titleRecruitment issues when primary care population clusters are used in randomised controlled clinical trials: Climbing mountains or pushing boulders uphill?en_UK
dc.typeJournal Articleen_UK
dc.rights.embargodate2999-12-31T00:00:00Z-
dc.rights.embargoreasonThe publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository therefore there is an embargo on the full text of the work.-
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cct.2006.08.004-
dc.citation.jtitleContemporary Clinical Trials-
dc.citation.issn1551-7144-
dc.citation.volume28-
dc.citation.issue3-
dc.citation.spage232-
dc.citation.epage241-
dc.citation.publicationstatusPublished-
dc.citation.peerreviewedRefereed-
dc.type.statusPublisher version (final published refereed version)-
dc.author.emailp.m.hoddinott@stir.ac.uk-
dc.contributor.affiliationHS Research - Stirling-
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Aberdeen-
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Aberdeen-
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Aberdeen-
dc.rights.embargoterms2999-12-31-
dc.rights.embargoliftdate2999-12-31-
dc.identifier.isi000245339800002-
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles

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