Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/8964
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Differences in self-assessed health by socioeconomic group amongst people with and without a history of cancer: an analysis using representative data from Scotland
Authors: Atherton, Iain
Evans, Josie
Dibben, Christopher J L
Woods, Laura
Hubbard, Gill
Contact Email: josie.evans@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Self-assessed health
Cancer survivors
Socioeconomic differences
Inequalities
Issue Date: Dec-2012
Citation: Atherton I, Evans J, Dibben CJL, Woods L & Hubbard G (2012) Differences in self-assessed health by socioeconomic group amongst people with and without a history of cancer: an analysis using representative data from Scotland, Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 6 (4), pp. 458-467.
Abstract: Introduction - This paper considers socioeconomic inequalities in self-assessed health amongst people with and without a history of cancer using representative data from Scotland. Methods - A cross-sectional analysis using the Scottish Health Survey was done. Cancer survivors were identified using linked Cancer Registry data. Bivariate and multivariate analysis was used to compare and contrast self-assessed health amongst those with a history of cancer to those without. Results - Of the 17,505 survey participants, 432 (2.5 %) had a history of cancer. After taking into account potential confounders, those in the lowest socioeconomic group were more likely to report poor health than those in the highest group amongst those with a history of cancer [odds ratio, 2.96; confidence interval (CI), 1.82–4.80] and those with no history of cancer (odds ratio, 2.45; CI, 2.21–2.71). Those in the lowest socioeconomic group with no history of cancer had a greater propensity to report poor health than any of the highest groups that did have a history of cancer (p less than 0.01). Differences in propensities to indicate poor health were particularly marked amongst those 4 years or more post-cancer diagnosis. Conclusions - Findings underline the scale of socioeconomic gradients in health. That disparities were so wide amongst those most temporally distant from initial diagnosis is particularly a concern given improving survival after a cancer diagnosis. Implications for cancer survivors - Socioeconomic circumstances have a considerable influence on health and well-being. Practitioners and policy makers should consider socioeconomic circumstances in considering approaches to health and social care of cancer survivors.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11764-012-0226-x
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