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Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: The effect of pre-shot routines on golf wedge shot performance
Authors: Mccann, Paul
Lavallee, David
Lavallee, Ruth
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Keywords: task performance
Issue Date: 2001
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Citation: Mccann P, Lavallee D & Lavallee R (2001) The effect of pre-shot routines on golf wedge shot performance, European Journal of Sport Science, 1 (5), pp. 231-240.
Abstract: The objective of this study was to examine the effect of pre-performance routines among golfers of low skill and non-golfers on wedge golf shot performance. The intervention strategies involved a physical skill and cognitive-behavioral routine program, as well as a physical skills-only program. Performance was measured on a pre-intervention test, postintervention test, and following a period of time without treatment, and involved wedge shots being played from distances of 40, 50, and 60 m from a target. Participants in this study (N = 68) were assigned to either a golfer or non-golfer group. Participants in the treatment groups attended 2 practice sessions per week during the acquisition phase. A variable practice design was incorporated during the intervention phase. Non-golfers in both intervention groups improved performance following the acquisition phase and maintained these levels of performance in the retention test. Greater improvements in performance were found in the non-golfer physical skills and cognitive-behavioral routine group. The non-golfer physical skills and cognitive-behavioral routine group was the only group to realize significant improvements in performance when comparing initial test performance measures to post-intervention and retention test performance measures across all test distances. Although the golfer treatment groups had consistent improvement in performance measures following the intervention phase, these improvements did not reach statistical significance in the majority of cases.
Type: Journal Article
DOI Link:
Rights: Publisher policy allows this work to be made available in this repository. This is an electronic version of an article published in European Journal of Sport Science, Volume 1, Issue 5, 2001, pp. 1-10. European Journal of Sport Science is available online at:
Notes: ISSN: 1439-6319
Affiliation: College of The Bahamas
School of Sport

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