Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/7458
Appears in Collections:Aquaculture Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Fisheries production in Southeast Asian farmer managed aquatic systems (FMAS): I. Characterisation of systems
Authors: Amilhat, Elsa
Lorenzen, Kai
Morales, Ernesto J
Yakupitiyage, Amararatne
Little, David Colin
Contact Email: d.c.little@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Accounting
Animals
AQUACULTURE
AREAS
C
concept
Countries
difference
diversity
FARMERS
farming
FIELD
FIELDS
fisheries
fishery
habitat
HOUSEHOLDS
Management
market
MARKETS
ORDER
PONDS
resources
rice-field
rights
SYSTEM
Systems
Technology
Thailand
Vietnam
Issue Date: Nov-2009
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Amilhat E, Lorenzen K, Morales EJ, Yakupitiyage A & Little DC (2009) Fisheries production in Southeast Asian farmer managed aquatic systems (FMAS): I. Characterisation of systems, Aquaculture, 296 (3-4), pp. 219-226.
Abstract: Southeast Asian rice farmers often manage aquatic habitats and resources on their land to increase production of aquatic animals. We introduce the concept of 'farmer-managed aquatic systems' (FMAS) to capture the diversity of these resource systems at the interface of aquaculture and capture fisheries and characterize FMAS in contrasting agro-ecosystems of Cambodia, Thailand and Vietnam. Cambodian and Thai FMAS yielded primarily self-recruiting species (SRS) and were managed to allow or attract them, while Vietnamese FMAS were managed more intensively to produce mostly hatchery-reared species. More than 90% of rice fanning households in the study areas of Cambodia and Thailand harvested aquatic animals from their land, and about 70% created aquatic habitats such as ponds in addition to rice fields in order to increase aquatic resource production. Cambodian households created and utilized a wide variety of man-made aquatic habitats, while Thai households created predominantly trap ponds. In contrast, less than half of Vietnamese farming households harvested SRS and very few undertook FMAS management specifically for them. Vietnamese FMAS were intensively stocked and managed as aquaculture systems. with SRS accounting for less than 30% of production. Nonetheless, SRS production per area of FMAS was comparable in the three countries. Contrasting FMAS characteristics in different study areas reflect underlying differences in agro-ecosystems, aquaculture technologies, farmer livelihoods and markets.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/7458
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aquaculture.2009.08.014
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Imperial College London
Imperial College London
University of Stirling
Asian Institute of Technology
Aquaculture

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