Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/7435

Appears in Collections:Aquaculture Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Aquaculture: Global status and trends
Authors: Bostock, John
McAndrew, Brendan
Richards, Randolph
Jauncey, Kim
Telfer, Trevor
Lorenzen, Kai
Little, David Colin
Ross, Lindsay
Handisyde, Neil
Gatward, Iain
Corner, Richard
Contact Email: d.c.little@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: aquaculture
resources
integration
development
competitiveness
Issue Date: Sep-2010
Publisher: The Royal Society
Citation: Bostock J, McAndrew B, Richards R, Jauncey K, Telfer T, Lorenzen K, Little DC, Ross L, Handisyde N, Gatward I & Corner R (2010) Aquaculture: Global status and trends, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 365 (1554), pp. 2897-2912.
Abstract: Aquaculture contributed 43 per cent of aquatic animal food for human consumption in 2007 (e.g. fish, crustaceans and molluscs, but excluding mammals, reptiles and aquatic plants) and is expected to grow further to meet the future demand. It is very diverse and, contrary to many perceptions, dominated by shellfish and herbivorous and omnivorous pond fish either entirely or partly utilizing natural productivity. The rapid growth in the production of carnivorous species such as salmon, shrimp and catfish has been driven by globalizing trade and favourable economics of larger scale intensive farming. Most aquaculture systems rely on low/uncosted environmental goods and services, so a critical issue for the future is whether these are brought into company accounts and the consequent effects this would have on production economics. Failing that, increased competition for natural resources will force governments to allocate strategically or leave the market to determine their use depending on activities that can extract the highest value. Further uncertainties include the impact of climate change, future fisheries supplies (for competition and feed supply), practical limits in terms of scale and in the economics of integration and the development and acceptability of new bio-engineering technologies. In the medium term, increased output is likely to require expansion in new environments, further intensification and efficiency gains for more sustainable and cost- effective production. The trend towards enhanced intensive systems with key monocultures remains strong and, at least for the foreseeable future, will be a significant contributor to future supplies. Dependence on external feeds (including fish), water and energy are key issues. Some new species will enter production and policies that support the reduction of resource footprints and improve integration could lead to new developments as well as reversing decline in some more traditional systems.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/7435
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2010.0170
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Aquaculture
Aquaculture
Aquaculture
Aquaculture
Aquaculture
Imperial College London
Aquaculture
Aquaculture
University of Stirling
University of Stirling
Aquaculture

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
dlittle_royalsociety_2010.pdf1.27 MBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 31/12/2999     Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependant on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.

This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.