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Appears in Collections:Management, Work and Organisation eTheses
Title: The societal culture dimension within the human resource practices of Taiwanese management in the UK
Authors: Chen, I Chun Lisa
Supervisor(s): Baldry, Christopher
Issue Date: Mar-2006
Publisher: University of Stirling
Abstract: This thesis examines approaches to international human resource management by Taiwanese MNCs located in the UK. A range of international human resource management models are discussed, from the universalist paradigm originating in the US to more contextual models, particularly those emphasising the impact of culture. The key elements of Chinese culture and their application to management are reviewed Interview and questionnaire data is drawn from 32 Taiwanese companies operating in the UK in the manufacturing and financial services sectors, and is analysed using SPSS and NVivo packages. Key findings include that the cultural origin of Taiwanese managers remains crucial in the way they manage UK subsidiaries. The small size of the Taiwanese companies also influences their internationalisation and international human resource strategy. In addition, there is a sectoral difference in the different HR practices being adopted. Japanese MNCs have been the only non-western MNCs to have been studied in depth. Although the Japanese and Chinese have been said to share a similar culture, they are shown in this thesis to adopt different techniques to achieve their HRM goals. It is concluded that many goals similar to those of western models of HRM can be found in Taiwanese MNCs, but achieved through different HR practices, for example, group reward rather than individual reward for commitment. It is suggested that conventional HRM frameworks fail to readily explain companies of non-western origin and the thesis tries to develop an IHRM model suitable for Chinese MNCs. Following strong economic development in China, research on Taiwanese MNCs can contribute to future perspectives on Chinese internationalisation and management transfer.
Type: Thesis or Dissertation
Affiliation: Stirling Management School

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