Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/6506
Appears in Collections:eTheses from Stirling Management School legacy departments
Title: An evaluation of the effect of lack of availability and poor distribution of information on successful job and organisation design in workers' co-operatives
Authors: Carlisle, B. T. J.
Issue Date: 1988
Publisher: University of Stirling
Abstract: This Thesis documents an exploratory investigation into the effect of poor information management on successful job and organisation design in workers' co-operatives. It was hypothesised that lack of availability and poor distribution of information militate against successful job and organisation design. Since sound information management is imperative for decision making and successful job and organisation design ensures workers satisfaction this study is fully justified. It is important that workers' co-operatives are economically successful and that people enjoy working in them. The topic is particularly important for the workers' co-operative movement because little research has been conducted on the links between information management and job and organisation design. The Thesis summarises the main issues and concepts relevant to the research topic and describes the implications of information management for job and organisation design in workers' co-operatives. The purchasing processes in four workers' co-operatives in Scotland were chosen as the information systems to be studied. Research field work, in the form of a Job Diagnosis Survey was also carried out to establish the links between information management and job and organisation design. Research results have been examined in relation to the participative arrangements one associates with workers' co-operatives. It was found that in addition to information management, other issues have an effect on successful job and organisation design. These include: objectives of each business; Argyris's Theory in Action; Lack of management skills; and poor systems design. This led to a comparison of the four co-operatives studied with the very successful Mondragon Group. Finally the implications of the research results have been discussed in relation to the workers' co-operative movement and to future research by those interested or involved in the movement.
Type: Thesis or Dissertation
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/6506
Affiliation: Stirling Management School
Department of Business and Management



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