Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/3674

Appears in Collections:School of Health Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Preliminary evidence that glucose ingestion facilitates prospective memory performance
Authors: Riby, Leigh M
Law, Anna S
McLaughlin, Jennifer
Murray, Jennifer
Contact Email: jennifer.murray@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Carbohydrates
Glucose
Glucose regulation
Cognition
Mental performance
Prospective memory
Issue Date: May-2011
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Riby LM, Law AS, McLaughlin J & Murray J (2011) Preliminary evidence that glucose ingestion facilitates prospective memory performance, Nutrition Research, 31 (5), pp. 370-377.
Abstract: Previous research has found that the ingestion of glucose boosts task performance in the memory domain (including tasks tapping episodic, semantic, and working memory). The present pilot study tested the hypothesis that glucose ingestion would enhance performance on a test of prospective memory. In a between-subjects design, 56 adults ranging from 17 to 80 years of age performed a computerized prospective memory task and an attention (filler) task after 25 g of glucose or a sweetness-matched placebo. Blood glucose measurements were also taken to assess the impact of individual differences on glucose regulation. After the drink containing glucose, cognitive facilitation was observed on the prospective memory task after excluding subjects with impaired fasting glucose level. Specifically, subjects receiving glucose were 19% more accurate than subjects receiving a placebo, a trend that was marginally nonsignificant, F1,41 = 3.4, P = .07, but that had a medium effect size, d = 0.58. Subjects receiving glucose were also significantly faster on the prospective memory task, F1,35 = 4.8, P < .05, d = 0.6. In addition, elevated baseline blood glucose (indicative of poor glucose regulation) was associated with slower prospective memory responding, F1, 35 = 4.4, P < .05, d = 0.57. These data add to the growing body of evidence suggesting that both memory and executive functioning can benefit from the increased provision of glucose to the brain. Abbreviations: NART, National Adult Reading Test; PM, prospective memory; RT, reaction time; SD, standard deviation; SART, Sustained Attention to Response Task
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/3674
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nutres.2011.04.003
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author; you can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Northumbria University
Liverpool John Moores University
University of Stirling
NMAHP

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