Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/3124
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: No Effect of Carbohydrate-Protein on Cycling Performance and Indices of Recovery
Authors: Breen, Leigh
Tipton, Kevin
Jeukendrup, Asker E
Contact Email: k.d.tipton@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Endurance Exercise
Sarcolemmal Disruption
Issue Date: Jun-2010
Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins / American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM)
Citation: Breen L, Tipton K & Jeukendrup AE (2010) No Effect of Carbohydrate-Protein on Cycling Performance and Indices of Recovery, Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 42 (6), pp. 1140-1148.
Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether adding protein to a CHO beverage would improve late-exercise cycle time-trial performance over CHO alone. Furthermore, we examined the effects of coingesting protein with CHO during exercise on postexercise markers of sarcolemmal disruption and the recovery of muscle function. Methods: In a double-blind, crossover design, 12 trained male cyclists performed 120 min of steady-state (SS) cycling at approximately 55% V˙ O2max followed by a time trial lasting approximately 1 h. At 15-min intervals during SS exercise, participants consumed either a CHO or a CHO + protein (CHO + Pro) beverage (providing 65 gIhj1 CHO or 65 gIhj1 CHO plus 19 gIhj1 protein). Twenty-four hours after the onset of the SS cycle, participants completed a maximum isometric strength test. At rest and 24 h postexercise, a visual analog scale was used to determine lower-limb muscle soreness, and blood samples were obtained for plasma creatine kinase concentration. Dietary control was implemented 24 h before and during the time course of each trial. Results: Average power output sustained during time trial was similar for CHO and CHO + Pro, with no effect of treatment on the time to complete the time trial (60:13 T 1:33 and 60:51 T 2:40 (min:s) for CHO and CHO + Pro, respectively). Postexercise isometric strength significantly declined for CHO (15% T 3%) and CHO + Pro (11% T 3%) compared with baseline (486 T 28 N). Plasma creatine kinase concentrations, and visual analog scale soreness significantly increased at 24 h postexercise, with no difference between treatments. Conclusions: The present findings suggest that CHO + Pro coingestion during exercise does not improve late-exercise time-trial performance, ameliorate markers of sarcolemmal disruption, or enhance the recovery of muscle function at 24 h postexercise over CHO alone
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/3124
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181c91f1a
Rights: Copyright 2010 by the American College of Sports Medicine; The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author; you can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University of Birmingham
Sport
University of Birmingham

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Breen 10 cho-prot ingestion cycling MSSE.pdf279.57 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 31/12/2999     Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependant on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.

This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.