Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/2938
Appears in Collections:Aquaculture Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Environmental and dietary influences on highly unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis and expression of fatty acyl desaturase and elongase genes in liver of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)
Authors: Zheng, Xiaozhong
Torstensen, Bente E
Tocher, Douglas R
Dick, James R
Henderson, R James
Bell, J Gordon
Contact Email: drt1@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Atlantic salmon
Salmo salar
fish oil
vegetable oil
polyunsaturated fatty acid
biosynthesis
Desaturase
Elongase
Gene expression
Enzyme activity
Environmental regulation
Nutritional regulation
Issue Date: 1-May-2005
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Zheng X, Torstensen BE, Tocher DR, Dick JR, Henderson RJ & Bell JG (2005) Environmental and dietary influences on highly unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis and expression of fatty acyl desaturase and elongase genes in liver of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA)- Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids, 1734 (1), pp. 13-24.
Abstract: Highly unsaturated fatty acid (HUFA) synthesis in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) was known to be influenced by both nutritional and environmental factors. Here we aimed to test the hypothesis that both these effectors involved similar molecular mechanisms. Thus, HUFA biosynthetic activity and the expression of fatty acyl desaturase and elongase genes were determined at various points during an entire two year production cycle in salmon fed diets containing either 100% fish oil or diets in which a high proportion (75% and 100%) of fish oil was replaced by C18 polyunsaturated fatty acid-rich vegetable oil. The results showed that HUFA biosynthesis in Atlantic salmon varied during the growth cycle with peak activity around seawater transfer and subsequent low activities in seawater. Consistent with this, gene expression of Δ6 desaturase, the rate-limiting step in the HUFA biosynthetic pathway, was highest around the point of seawater transfer and lowest during the seawater phase. In addition, the expression of both Δ6 and Δ5 desaturase genes was generally higher in fish fed the vegetable oil-substituted diets compared to fish fed fish oil, particularly in the seawater phase. Again, generally consistent with this, the activity of the HUFA biosynthetic pathway was invariably higher in fish fed diets in which fish oil was substituted by vegetable oil compared to fish fed only fish oil. In conclusion, these studies showed that both nutritional and environmental modulation of HUFA biosynthesis in Atlantic salmon involved regulation of fatty acid desaturase gene expression.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/2938
URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/13881981
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbalip.2005.01.006
Rights: Published in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids by Elsevier. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids, Volume 1734, Issue 1, May 2005, pp. 13 - 24.; This is the peer reviewed version of this article.; NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids, VOL 1734, ISSUE 1, (May 2005). DOI 10.1016/j.bbalip.2005.01.006.
Affiliation: Aquaculture
National Institute of Nutrition and Seafood Research (NIFES)
Aquaculture
Aquaculture
University of Stirling
Aquaculture

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