Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/25710
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Social Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Cognitive stimulation therapy in dementia care: exploring the views and experiences of service providers on the barriers and facilitators to implementation in practice using Normalization Process Theory (Forthcoming/Available Online)
Authors: Dickinson, Claire
Gibson, Grant
Gotts, Zoe
Stobbart, Lynne
Robinson, Louise
Contact Email: grant.gibson@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: dementia
cognitive stimulation therapy
psychosocial intervention
community care
post-diagnostic care
Issue Date: 13-Jul-2017
Citation: Dickinson C, Gibson G, Gotts Z, Stobbart L & Robinson L (2017) Cognitive stimulation therapy in dementia care: exploring the views and experiences of service providers on the barriers and facilitators to implementation in practice using Normalization Process Theory (Forthcoming/Available Online), International Psychogeriatrics.
Abstract: Background: Cognitive stimulation therapy (CST) is an evidence-based, cost-effective psychosocial intervention for people with dementia but is currently not a standard part of post-diagnostic care. This qualitative study explored the views and experiences of dementia care providers on the barriers and facilitators to its implementation in usual care.  Method: Thirty four semi-structured interviews (24 participants) were conducted across four dementia care sites in the North of England; ten were follow-up interviews. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis and then mapped to the Normalization Process Theory framework.  Results: Participants considered CST a “good fit” with their “preferred” ways of working and goals of dementia care namely the provision of person-centered services. For facilitators delivering the intervention, compared to other behavioral interventions, CST was seen to offer benefits to their work and was easy to understand as an intervention. Training in CST and seeing benefits for clients were important motivators. Time and resources were crucial for the successful implementation of CST. Participants were keen to objectively measure benefits to participants but unsure how to do this.  Conclusions: CST is a cost-effective psychosocial intervention for people with dementia, recommended by national guidance. Despite our findings which show that, using the NPT framework, there are more facilitators than barriers to the implementation of CST, it is still not a standard part of post-diagnostic dementia care. Further research is needed to explore the reasons for this implementation gap in ensuring evidence-based care in translated into practice.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1041610217001272
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. This article has been accepted for publication in International Psychogeriatrics. This version is free to view and download for private research and study only. Not for re-distribution, re-sale or use in derivative works. © International Psychogeriatric Association 2017

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