Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/25619
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Social Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Unrefereed
Title: The rise and fall and rise again of the therapeutic community (Editorial)
Authors: Yates, Rowdy
Contact Email: p.r.yates@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Funding
TC practice
Therapeutic communities
Residential
TC history
Marginalization
Issue Date: 2017
Citation: Yates R (2017) The rise and fall and rise again of the therapeutic community (Editorial), Therapeutic Communities, 38 (2), pp. 57-59.
Abstract: Purpose  Therapeutic communities (and many other residential services) have been effectively marginalised in recent years with the increasing popularity of community-based outpatient responses to a variety of social issues including addiction, learning difficulties, mental health issues, etc. The paper aims to discuss this issue.   Design/methodology/approach  This has inevitably led to a low profile and has resulted in a lack of knowledge about therapeutic communities and how the methodology differs significantly from other approaches.   Findings  This situation is beginning to change in a number of fields and it is important that the therapeutic community movement adapts its methodology to the needs of their respective client groups and clarifies its approach (and the efficacy of that approach) to funders and service commissioners.  Originality/value  This paper is a personal contribution
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/TC-05-2017-0014
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