Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/25381
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Social Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Flowers of argument and engagement? Reconsidering critical perspectives on adult education and literate practices (Forthcoming/Available Online)
Authors: Galloway, Sarah
Contact Email: s.j.galloway@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Adult education
adult literacies education
critical education
empowerment
emancipation
Issue Date: 25-Jan-2017
Citation: Galloway S (2017) Flowers of argument and engagement? Reconsidering critical perspectives on adult education and literate practices (Forthcoming/Available Online), International Journal of Lifelong Education.
Abstract: This paper takes up an existing discussion around critical perspectives on adult education, in particular how empowerment and emancipation have been understood. Previously in this journal, concern has been raised with traditional understandings of critical adult education. The problem is that these tend to assume that learners require assistance from experts, be they teachers or researchers, in order to gain understanding of how they are oppressed. The purpose of this paper is to present a deeper engagement with this concern through an examination of how both empowering and emancipatory adult education have been understood and practised. The demarcation is examined in the context of the historical development of critical understandings and practices associated with adult literacies learning, as a significant field of adult education where the idea of empowerment and emancipation has been theorised. The ideas and practices associated with empowering literacies are defended as ways for learners to gain positions from which to speak and be heard, as well as support participation in work, community and family life. Informed by the ideas of Jacques Rancière, there is also acknowledgement that societal inequalities are increasing, necessitating a need to consider how adult education might encourage political transformation and emancipation.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02601370.2017.1280859
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in International Journal of Lifelong Education on 25 Jan 2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/02601370.2017.1280859

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