Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/25109
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Exercise guidelines to promote cardiometabolic health in spinal cord injured humans: time to raise the intensity?
Authors: Nightingale, Tom E
Metcalfe, Richard
Vollaard, Niels
Bilzon, James L J
Contact Email: n.vollaard@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Spinal cord injury
Cardiometabolic health
High-intensity interval training
Vigorous-intensity exercise
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Issue Date: Aug-2017
Citation: Nightingale TE, Metcalfe R, Vollaard N & Bilzon JLJ (2017) Exercise guidelines to promote cardiometabolic health in spinal cord injured humans: time to raise the intensity?, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 98 (9), pp. 1693-1704.
Abstract: Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a life changing event that, as a result of paralysis, negatively influences habitual levels of physical activity and hence cardiometabolic health. Performing regular structured exercise therefore appears extremely important in persons with SCI. However, exercise options are mainly limited to the upper-body, which involves a smaller activated muscle mass compared to the mainly leg-based activities commonly performed by non-disabled individuals. Current exercise guidelines for SCI focus predominantly on relative short durations of moderate-intensity aerobic arm cranking exercise, yet contemporary evidence suggests this is not sufficient to induce meaningful improvements in risk factors for the prevention of cardiometabolic disease in this population. As such, these guidelines and their physiological basis, require reappraisal. In this special communication, we propose that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) may be a viable alternative exercise strategy, to promote vigorous-intensity exercise and prevent cardiometabolic disease in persons with SCI. Supplementing the limited data from SCI cohorts with consistent findings from studies in non-disabled populations, we present strong evidence to suggest that HIIT is superior to moderate-intensity aerobic exercise for improving cardiorespiratory fitness, insulin sensitivity and vascular function. The potential application and safety of HIIT in this population is also discussed. We conclude that increasing exercise intensity could offer a simple, readily available, time-efficient solution to improve cardiometabolic health in persons with SCI. We call for high-quality randomised controlled trials to examine the efficacy and safety of HIIT in this population.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apmr.2016.12.008
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Accepted refereed manuscript of: Nightingale TE, Metcalfe R, Vollaard N & Bilzon JLJ (2017) Exercise guidelines to promote cardiometabolic health in spinal cord injured humans: time to raise the intensity?, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 98 (9), pp. 1693-1704. DOI: 10.1016/j.apmr.2016.12.008 © 2017, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
20170301-APMR_HIIT_Review_Final.pdf2.46 MBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 13/1/2018     Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependent on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.



This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.