Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/25100
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Association between bisphosphonate therapy and outcomes from rehabilitation in older people
Authors: Goodbrand, James A
Hughes, Lloyd D
Cochrane, Lynda
Donnan, Peter T
Frost, Helen
McMurdo, Marion E T
Witham, Miles D
Contact Email: helen.frost@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Older
Bisphosphonate
Rehabilitation
Resilience
Issue Date: May-2017
Citation: Goodbrand JA, Hughes LD, Cochrane L, Donnan PT, Frost H, McMurdo MET & Witham MD (2017) Association between bisphosphonate therapy and outcomes from rehabilitation in older people, Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 70, pp. 195-200.
Abstract: Background  Bisphosphonate therapy may have actions beyond bone, including effects on cardiovascular, immune and muscle function. We tested whether bisphosphonate treatment is associated with improved outcomes in older people undergoing inpatient rehabilitation.  Methods  Analysis of prospectively collected, linked routine clinical datasets. Participants were divided into never users of bisphosphonates, use prior to rehabilitation only, use after rehabilitation only, and current users (use before and after rehabilitation). We calculated change in 20-point Barthel scores during rehabilitation, adjusting for comorbid disease and laboratory data using multivariable regression analysis. Cox regression analyses were performed to analyse the association between bisphosphonate use and time to death or hospitalisation.  Results  2797 patients were included in the analysis. Current bisphosphonate users showed greater improvement in Barthel score during rehabilitation than non-users (5.0 points [95%CI 4.3–5.7] vs 3.8 [95%CI 3.6–3.9]), but no difference compared to those receiving bisphosphonates only after discharge (5.1 [95%CI 4.6–5.5]). Previous bisphosphonate use was significantly associated with time to death (adjusted hazard ratio 1.41 [95%CI 1.15–1.73]) but less strongly with time to combined endpoint of hospitalisation or death (adjusted hazard ratio 1.18 [95%CI 0.98–1.48]). Use after discharge from rehabilitation was associated with reduced risk of death (adjusted hazard ratio 0.64 [95%CI 0.55–0.73]; hazard ratio per year of bisphosphonate prescription 0.98 [95%CI 0.97–0.99]).  Conclusion  Bisphosphonate use is unlikely to be causally associated with improved physical function in older people, but continuing use may be associated with lower risk of death.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.archger.2017.01.017
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Accepted refereed manuscript of: Goodbrand JA, Hughes LD, Cochrane L, Donnan PT, Frost H, McMurdo MET & Witham MD (2017) Association between bisphosphonate therapy and outcomes from rehabilitation in older people, Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 70, pp. 195-200. DOI: 10.1016/j.archger.2017.01.017 © 2017, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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