Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/24833
Appears in Collections:Aquaculture Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Comparative study on fatty acid metabolism of early stages of two crustacean species: Artemia sp. metanauplii and Grapsus adscensionis zoeae, as live prey for marine animals
Authors: Reis, D B
Acosta, Nieves Guadalupe
Almansa, Eduardo
Navarro, Juan Carlos
Tocher, Douglas R
Andrade, Jose Pedro
Sykes, Antonio V
Rodriguez, Covadonga
Contact Email: d.r.tocher@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Artemia sp. metanauplii
Grapsus adscensionis zoeae
Lipid metabolism
Marine larvae
Unsaturated fatty acids
Issue Date: Feb-2017
Citation: Reis DB, Acosta NG, Almansa E, Navarro JC, Tocher DR, Andrade JP, Sykes AV & Rodriguez C (2017) Comparative study on fatty acid metabolism of early stages of two crustacean species: Artemia sp. metanauplii and Grapsus adscensionis zoeae, as live prey for marine animals, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part B: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 204, pp. 53-60.
Abstract: The present study compared the lipid composition andin vivocapability ofArtemiasp. metanauplii (the main live prey used in aquaculture) andGrapsus adscensioniszoeae (as a wild zooplankton model) to metabolise unsaturated fatty acids. The two species were incubatedin vivowith 0.3μM of individual [1- 14C]fatty acids (FA) including 18:1n‐9, 18:2n‐6, 18:3n‐3, 20:4n‐6 (ARA), 20:5n‐3 (EPA) and 22:6n‐3 (DHA) bound to bovine serum albumin (BSA). Compared to metanauplii, zoeae contained twice the content of polar lipids (PL) and eight-fold the content of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA).Artemiasp. metanauplii showed increased short chain fatty acidde novosynthesis from beta-oxidation of [1-14C]LC-PUFA, preferentially DHA. Of the LC-PUFA, DHA showed the highest esterification rate intoArtemiasp. triacylglycerols. In contrast, inGrapsuszoeae [1-14C]DHA displayed the highest transformation rate into longer chain-length FAs and was preferentially esterified into PL. EPA and ARA, tended to be more easily incorporated and/or retained than DHA inArtemiasp. Moreover, both EPA and ARA were preferentially esterified intoArtemiaPL, which theoretically would favour their bioavailability to the larvae. In addition to the inherent better nutritional value ofGrapsuszoeae due to their intrinsic lipid composition, the changes taking place after the lipid incorporation, point at two distinct models of lipid metabolism that indicate zoeae as a more suitable prey thanArtemiasp. for the feeding of marine animals.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpb.2016.11.002
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Accepted refereed manuscript of: Reis DB, Acosta NG, Almansa E, Navarro JC, Tocher DR, Andrade JP, Sykes AV & Rodriguez C (2017) Comparative study on fatty acid metabolism of early stages of two crustacean species: Artemia sp. metanauplii and Grapsus adscensionis zoeae, as live prey for marine animals, Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - Part B: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 204, pp. 53-60. DOI: 10.1016/j.cbpb.2016.11.002 © 2016, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

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