Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/24577
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Don't be so hard on yourself! Changes in self-compassion during the first year of university are associated with changes in well-being
Authors: Gunnell, Katie
Mosewich, Amber
McEwen, Carolyn
Eklund, Robert
Crocker, Peter R E
Contact Email: robert.eklund@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Self-compassion
Self-determination theory
Mental health
Longitudinal
College
Post-secondary
Well-being
Issue Date: 1-Mar-2017
Citation: Gunnell K, Mosewich A, McEwen C, Eklund R & Crocker PRE (2017) Don't be so hard on yourself! Changes in self-compassion during the first year of university are associated with changes in well-being, Personality and Individual Differences, 107, pp. 43-48.
Abstract: Introduction  Well-being declines during the first year of university. We examined if change in self-compassion was indirectly related to change in well-being through change in psychological need satisfaction during the first year of university.  Methods  First year university students (N=189, 77.2% female) completed self-report questionnaires at the beginning of the first semester and approximately five months later. Path analysis and bootstrapping procedures were used to examine residualized change scores.  Results  Change in self-compassion was positively related to (ps<0.05) change in psychological need satisfaction (β=0.49) and negatively related to change in negative affect (β=−0.24). Change in psychological need satisfaction was positively associated (ps<0.05) with change in vitality (β=0.58) and change in positive affect (β=0.52) and negatively associated with change in negative affect (β=−0.29). Change in self-compassion was indirectly related to change in vitality (b=0.56, 95% bootstrapped bias corrected confidence interval (BcCI)[0.38, 0.77]), positive affect (b=0.41, 95%BcCI [0.27, 0.58]), and negative affect (b=−0.26, 95%BcCI[−0.41, −0.13]) through change in psychological need satisfaction.  Conclusions  During the first year of university, change in self-compassion was associated with change in well-being because self-compassion enhanced psychological need satisfaction. Results highlight the potential of enhancing self-compassion during first year university to help mitigate student declines in well-being.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2016.11.032
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Accepted refereed manuscript of: Gunnell K, Mosewich A, McEwen C, Eklund R & Crocker P (2017) Don't be so hard on yourself! Changes in self-compassion during the first year of university are associated with changes in well-being, Personality and Individual Differences, 107, pp. 43-48. DOI: 10.1016/j.paid.2016.11.032 © 2016, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Self-compassion_needs_well-being_final_R1 (002).pdf309.29 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 17/11/2018     Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependent on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.



This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.