Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/24571
Appears in Collections:Economics Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Disentangling the influence of knowledge on attribute non-attendance (Forthcoming/Available Online)
Authors: Sandorf, Erlend Dancke
Campbell, Danny
Hanley, Nick
Contact Email: danny.campbell@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Attribute non-attendance
Discrete choice experiment
Knowledge
Attribute processing strategies
Cold-water coral
Ecosystem services
Issue Date: 22-Sep-2016
Citation: Sandorf ED, Campbell D & Hanley N (2016) Disentangling the influence of knowledge on attribute non-attendance (Forthcoming/Available Online), Journal of Choice Modelling.
Abstract: We seek to disentangle the effect of knowledge about an environmental good on respondents' propensity to ignore one or more attributes on the choice cards in a discrete choice experiment eliciting people's preferences for increased protection of cold-water corals in Norway. We hypothesize that a respondent's level of knowledge influences the degree to which she ignores attributes. Respondents participated in a quiz on cold-water coral prior to the valuation task and we use the result of the quiz as anex-antemeasure of their knowledge. Our results suggests that a high level of knowledge, measured by a high quiz score, is associated with higher probabilities of attendance to the three non-cost attributes, although this effect is only significant for one of them. A higher quiz score is also associated with a significantly lower probability of attending to the cost attribute. Furthermore, although being told your score has mixed directional effects on attribute non-attendance, it does not significantly affect the probability of attending to any of the attributes. Finally, allowing for attribute non-attendance leads to substantially lower conditional willingness-to-pay estimates. This highlights the importance of measuring how much people know about the goods over which they are choosing, and underlines that more research is needed to understand how information influences the degree to which respondents ignore attributes.
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jocm.2016.09.003
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Sandorf-etal-JCM-2016.pdf657.55 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 22/3/2018     Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependent on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.



This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.