Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/24373
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Transitioning to routine breast cancer risk assessment and management in primary care: What can we learn from cardiovascular disease?
Authors: Phillips, Kelly-Anne
Steel, Emma
Collins, Ian
Emery, Jon
Pirotta, Marie
Mann, G Bruce
Butow, Phyllis
Hopper, John L
Trainer, Alison
Moreton, Jane
Antoniou, Antonis C
Cuzick, John
Keogh, Louise
Contact Email: emma.steel@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: decision support
risk management
screening
tamoxifen
Issue Date: 24-Feb-2015
Publisher: CSIRO
Citation: Phillips K, Steel E, Collins I, Emery J, Pirotta M, Mann GB, Butow P, Hopper JL, Trainer A, Moreton J, Antoniou AC, Cuzick J & Keogh L (2015) Transitioning to routine breast cancer risk assessment and management in primary care: What can we learn from cardiovascular disease?, Australian Journal of Primary Health, 22 (3), pp. 255-261.
Abstract: To capitalise on advances in breast cancer prevention, all women would need to have their breast cancer risk formally assessed. With ~85% of Australians attending primary care clinics at least once a year, primary care is an opportune location for formal breast cancer risk assessment and management. This study assessed the current practice and needs of primary care clinicians regarding assessment and management of breast cancer risk. Two facilitated focus group discussions were held with 17 primary care clinicians (12 GPs and 5 practice nurses (PNs)) as part of a larger needs assessment. Primary care clinicians viewed assessment and management of cardiovascular risk as an intrinsic, expected part of their role, often triggered by practice software prompts and facilitated by use of an online tool. Conversely, assessment of breast cancer risk was not routine and was generally patient- (not clinician-) initiated, and risk management (apart from routine screening) was considered outside the primary care domain. Clinicians suggested that routine assessment and management of breast cancer risk might be achieved if it were widely endorsed as within the remit of primary care and supported by an online risk-assessment and decision aid tool that was integrated into primary care software. This study identified several key issues that would need to be addressed to facilitate the transition to routine assessment and management of breast cancer risk in primary care, based largely on the model used for cardiovascular disease.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/24373
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/PY14156
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University of Melbourne
University of Melbourne
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
University of Melbourne
University of Melbourne
Royal Women's Hospital (Victoria Australia)
University of Sydney
University of Melbourne
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
Queen Mary, University of London
University of Melbourne

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