Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/24172
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: The Effects of Increased Body Temperature on Motor Control during Golf Putting
Authors: Mathers, John
Grealy, Madeleine A
Contact Email: j.f.mathers@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: scaling
increased body temperature
motor skill
golf putting
movement kinematics
Issue Date: 31-Aug-2016
Publisher: Frontiers Media
Citation: Mathers J & Grealy MA (2016) The Effects of Increased Body Temperature on Motor Control during Golf Putting, Frontiers in Psychology, 7, Art. No.: 1246.
Abstract: This study investigated the effect of increased core temperature on the performance outcome and movement kinematics of elite golfers during a golf putting task. The study aimed to examine individual differences in the extent to which increased temperature influenced the rate of putting success, whether increased temperature speeded up the timing of the putting downswing and whether elite golfers changed their movement kinematics during times of thermal stress. Six participants performed 20 putts to each of four putt distances (1, 2, 3, and 4 m) under normal temperature conditions and when core body temperature was increased. There was no significant difference in the number of successful putts between the two temperature conditions, but there was an increase in putterhead velocity at ball impact on successful putts to distances of 1 and 4 m when temperature was elevated. This reflected an increase in swing amplitude rather than a reduction in swing duration as hypothesized. There were individual differences in the motor control response to thermal stress as three of the golfers changed the kinematic parameters used to scale their putting movements to achieve putts of different distances at elevated temperatures. Theoretical implications for these findings and the practical implications for elite golfers and future research are discussed.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/24172
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01246
Rights: © 2016 Mathers and Grealy. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Affiliation: Sport
University of Strathclyde

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