Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Social Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Simultaneous temporal trends in dementia incidence and prevalence, 2005–2013: a population-based retrospective cohort study in Saskatchewan, Canada (Forthcoming/Available Online)
Authors: Kosteniuk, Julie G
Morgan, Debra G
O'Connell, Megan E
Kirk, Andrew
Crossley, Margaret
Teare, Gary F
Stewart, Norma J
Bello-Haas, Vanina Dal
McBain, Lesley
Mou, Haizhen
Forbes, Dorothy A
Innes, Anthea
Quail, Jacqueline M
Contact Email:
Keywords: dementia
long-term care
prescription drug
administrative data
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Cambridge University Press for International Psychogeriatric Association
Citation: Kosteniuk JG, Morgan DG, O'Connell ME, Kirk A, Crossley M, Teare GF, Stewart NJ, Bello-Haas VD, McBain L, Mou H, Forbes DA, Innes A & Quail JM (2016) Simultaneous temporal trends in dementia incidence and prevalence, 2005–2013: a population-based retrospective cohort study in Saskatchewan, Canada (Forthcoming/Available Online), International Psychogeriatrics.
Abstract: Background: Original studies published over the last decade regarding time trends in dementia report mixed results. The aims of the present study were to use linked administrative health data for the province of Saskatchewan for the period 2005/2006 to 2012/2013 to: (1) examine simultaneous temporal trends in annual age- and sex-specific dementia incidence and prevalence among individuals aged 45 and older, and (2) stratify the changes in incidence over time by database of identification. Methods: Using a population-based retrospective cohort study design, data were extracted from seven provincial administrative health databases linked by a unique anonymized identification number. Individuals 45 years and older at first identification of dementia between April 1, 2005 and March 31, 2013 were included, based on case definition criteria met within any one of four administrative health databases (hospital, physician, prescription drug, and long-term care). Results: Between 2005/2006 and 2012/2013, the 12-month age-standardized incidence rate of dementia declined significantly by 11.07% and the 12-month age-standardized prevalence increased significantly by 30.54%. The number of incident cases decreased from 3,389 to 3,270 and the number of prevalent cases increased from 8,795 to 13,012. Incidence rate reductions were observed in every database of identification. Conclusions: We observed a simultaneous trend of decreasing incidence and increasing prevalence of dementia over a relatively short 8-year time period from 2005/2006 to 2012/2013. These trends indicate that the average survival time of dementia is lengthening. Continued observation of these time trends is warranted given the short study period.
Type: Journal Article
DOI Link:
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Published in International Psychogeriatrics by Cambridge University Press. Copyright 2016 Cambridge University Press. Available at:
Affiliation: University of Saskatchewan
University of Saskatchewan
University of Saskatchewan
University of Saskatchewan
University of Saskatchewan
Saskatchewan Health Quality Council
University of Saskatchewan
McMaster University
First Nations University
University of Saskatchewan
University of Alberta
Dementia Studies
Saskatchewan Health Quality Council

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
AAM_Kosteniuk_et_al_2016_Int_PsyGer.pdf855.44 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 30/12/2016     Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependant on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.

This item is protected by original copyright

Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.