Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/23857
Appears in Collections:Aquaculture Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: The combined effects of diet, environment and genetics on pigmentation in the Giant Tiger Prawn, Penaeus monodon
Authors: Wade, Nicholas M
Budd, Alyssa
Irvin, Simon
Glencross, Brett
Contact Email: b.d.glencross@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Shrimp
Colour
Quantification
Carotenoid
Astaxanthin
Issue Date: 1-Dec-2015
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Wade NM, Budd A, Irvin S & Glencross B (2015) The combined effects of diet, environment and genetics on pigmentation in the Giant Tiger Prawn, Penaeus monodon, Aquaculture, 449, pp. 78-86.
Abstract: The colour of prawns, particularly the Giant Tiger Prawn Penaeus monodon, is highly desired and fetches premium market prices. Prawn pigmentation is influenced by the interaction of a range of factors, including the amount of dietary carotenoid, the distribution of hypodermal pigments, and genetics. These aspects have been studied in isolation, but there is limited knowledge on how these components interact to influence prawn pigmentation. This study tracked the colour of prawns that had been fed four different levels of dietary astaxanthin (Axn) over 6. weeks, and then transferred to either black or white coloured tanks. The dietary influence on colour was slow and had only developed after 6. weeks. Meanwhile the effect of background colour was rapid, within 15. min. Results showed that diet and background colour work in combination to affect prawn colour. The poorest colour was recorded in prawns fed without dietary Axn and transferred to white substrates, and this colour was improved by the addition of dietary Axn. Animals fed without dietary Axn and exposed to black substrates showed an intermediate colour, and this was further improved by the addition of dietary Axn. The best colour was recorded in prawns fed 100. mg/kg Axn and exposed to black substrates. The abundance of the epithelial pigment protein crustacyanin (CRCN) was not correlated with prawn colour, suggesting that this protein does not regulate the modifications in response to background colour. Finally, the effect of substrate exposure was assessed on farmed prawns, and indicated a small positive effect on colour during harvesting. These data demonstrate that while short term exposure to black substrates can have positive effects on prawn colour, dietary Axn supplementation can both improve pigmentation of animals exposed to black substrates, and prevent the negative effects of exposure to white substrates.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/23857
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aquaculture.2015.01.023
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Accepted refereed manuscript of: Wade NM, Budd A, Irvin S & Glencross B (2015) The combined effects of diet, environment and genetics on pigmentation in the Giant Tiger Prawn, Penaeus monodon, Aquaculture, 449, pp. 78-86. DOI: 10.1016/j.aquaculture.2015.01.023 © 2015, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution- NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Affiliation: CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research
CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)
Aquaculture

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