Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/23844
Appears in Collections:Aquaculture Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Quantitative methods to measure pigmentation variation in farmed Giant Tiger Prawns, Penaeus monodon, and the effects of different harvest methods on cooked colour
Authors: Wade, Nicholas M
Paulo, Carl
Goodall, Jake
Fischer, Mibu
Poole, Sue
Glencross, Brett
Contact Email: b.d.glencross@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Shrimp
Colour
Astaxanthin
Quantification
Issue Date: 20-Sep-2014
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Wade NM, Paulo C, Goodall J, Fischer M, Poole S & Glencross B (2014) Quantitative methods to measure pigmentation variation in farmed Giant Tiger Prawns, Penaeus monodon, and the effects of different harvest methods on cooked colour, Aquaculture, 433, pp. 513-519.
Abstract: Cooked prawn colour is known to be a driver of market price and a visual indicator of product quality for the consumer. Although there is a general understanding that colour variation exists in farmed prawns, there has been no attempt to quantify this variation or identify where this variation is most prevalent. The objectives of this study were threefold: firstly to compare three different quantitative methods to measure prawn colour or pigmentation, two different colorimeters and colour quantification from digital images. Secondly, to quantify the amount of pigmentation variation that exists in farmed prawns within ponds, across ponds and across farms. Lastly, to assess the effects of ice storage or freeze-thawing of raw product prior to cooking. Each method was able to detect quantitative differences in prawn colour, although conversion of image based quantification of prawn colour from RGB to Lab was unreliable. Considerable colour variation was observed between prawns from different ponds and different farms, and this variation potentially affects product value. Different post-harvest methods prior to cooking were also shown to have a profound detrimental effect on prawn colour. Both long periods of ice storage and freeze thawing of raw product were detrimental to prawn colour. However, ice storage immediately after cooking was shown to be beneficial to prawn colour. Results demonstrated that darker prawn colour was preserved by holding harvested prawns alive in chilled seawater, limiting the time between harvesting and cooking, and avoiding long periods of ice storage or freeze thawing of uncooked product.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/23844
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aquaculture.2014.07.014
Rights: Accepted refereed manuscript of: Wade NM, Paulo C, Goodall J, Fischer M, Poole S & Glencross B (2014) Quantitative methods to measure pigmentation variation in farmed Giant Tiger Prawns, Penaeus monodon, and the effects of different harvest methods on cooked colour, Aquaculture, 433, pp. 513-519. DOI: 10.1016/j.aquaculture.2014.07.014 © 2014, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution- NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Affiliation: CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research
Queensland Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Australia
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)
Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)
Queensland Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Australia
Aquaculture

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