Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/23589
Appears in Collections:Law and Philosophy Book Chapters and Sections
Title: A Tale of Two Dilemmas: Cognitive Kinds and the Extended Mind
Authors: Wheeler, Michael
Contact Email: m.w.wheeler@stir.ac.uk
Editors: Kendig, C
Citation: Wheeler M (2015) A Tale of Two Dilemmas: Cognitive Kinds and the Extended Mind. In: Kendig C (ed.). Natural Kinds and Classification in Scientific Practice. History and Philosophy of Biology, London: Routledge, pp. 175-185.
Issue Date: 3-Dec-2015
Publisher: Routledge
Series/Report no.: History and Philosophy of Biology
Abstract: First paragraph: Most work in cognitive science and naturalistic philosophy of mind is unashamedly internalist in outlook, in at least the following sense: the parts of the physical world where psychological states occur and where psychological processes happen are held to be located entirely inside the head. One’s first reaction to this sort of internalism about the mind might well be that it must be right. Indeed, given all those wonderful ‘pictures of the brain thinking’ that have been delivered over the past few years by contemporary neuroimaging techniques, where else could the material machinery of mind be? Enter the hypothesis of extended cognition (henceforth ExC). If ExC is true, there are actual (in this world) cases of intelligent thought and action, in which the material machinery that realizes the thinking and thoughts concerned is spatially distributed over brain, body and world, in such a way that the external (beyond-the-skull-and-skin) factors concerned are rightly accorded cognitive status. Here, ‘cognitive status’ is just a place-holder for ‘whatever status it is that we standardly grant the brain when explaining intelligent thought and action’.
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Published in Natural Kinds and Classification in Scientific Practice by Taylor & Francis. This is an electronic version of a book chapter published in Wheeler M (2016) Kendig C (ed.). Natural Kinds and Classification in Scientific Practice. History and Philosophy of Biology, London: Routledge, pp. 175-185. Natural Kinds and Classification in Scientific Practice can be found online at: https://www.routledge.com/Natural-Kinds-and-Classification-in-Scientific-Practice/Kendig/p/book/9781848935402
Type: Part of book or chapter of book
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/23589
URL: https://www.routledge.com/Natural-Kinds-and-Classification-in-Scientific-Practice/Kendig/p/book/9781848935402
Affiliation: Philosophy

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
wheeler_tale_two_dilemmas_STORRE.pdf398.19 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 4/6/2017     Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependant on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.

This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.