Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/23227
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Social Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: The landscape of UK child protection research between 2010 and 2014: disciplines, topics, and types of maltreatment
Authors: Soliman, Francesca
Mackay, Kirsteen
Clayton, Estelle
Gadda, Andressa
Jones, Chris
Anderson, Anna
Jones, Derek
Taylor, Julie
Contact Email: a.m.gadda@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Child maltreatment
Child protection research
Mapping review
Disciplines
Looked after children
Issue Date: Jun-2016
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Soliman F, Mackay K, Clayton E, Gadda A, Jones C, Anderson A, Jones D & Taylor J (2016) The landscape of UK child protection research between 2010 and 2014: disciplines, topics, and types of maltreatment, Children and Youth Services Review, 65, pp. 51-61.
Abstract: This paper draws on the results of a commissioned systematic map of UK child protection empirical research published between 2010 and 2014. It analyses current patterns in child protection research in relation to three variables – disciplinary background of authors, types of maltreatment examined, and focus of the research – and considers the relationship between these. It finds first authors' disciplines to be reliable indicators of both the focus and topic of the research, with the dominant fields of psychology, medicine, and social work addressing respectively the long term outcomes of sexual abuse, the short term outcomes of physical abuse, and the care system's response to child maltreatment. The proportion of research dedicated to specific types of maltreatment appears to depend on factors other than their real-world prevalence. Instead, definitional issues and ease of access to research participants appearing to be more influential in determining the topic of the research. UK child protection research appears to show narrow multidisciplinary interaction and little focus on preventative or ameliorative interventions. The development of a coordinated national strategy adopting an interdisciplinary approach in the design and commissioning of child protection research could help maximise research efforts by reducing duplication and potentially facilitating the emergence of more innovative directions.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/23227
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2016.03.021
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Accepted refereed manuscript of: Soliman F, Mackay K, Clayton E, Gadda A, Jones C, Anderson A, Jones D & Taylor J (2016) The landscape of UK child protection research between 2010 and 2014: disciplines, topics, and types of maltreatment, Children and Youth Services Review, 65, pp. 51-61. DOI: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2016.03.021 © 2016, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Affiliation: Glasgow Caledonian University
University of Edinburgh
University of Edinburgh
Social Work
University of Strathclyde
University of Edinburgh
University of Edinburgh
University of Birmingham

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