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Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Gender differences in the impact of population-level alcohol policy interventions: evidence synthesis of systematic reviews
Authors: Fitzgerald, Niamh
Angus, Kathryn
Emslie, Carol
Shipton, Deborah
Bauld, Linda
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Issue Date: Oct-2016
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Citation: Fitzgerald N, Angus K, Emslie C, Shipton D & Bauld L (2016) Gender differences in the impact of population-level alcohol policy interventions: evidence synthesis of systematic reviews, Addiction, 111 (10), pp. 1735-1747.
Abstract: Background: Consistent review-level evidence supports the effectiveness of population-level alcohol policies in reducing alcohol-related harms. Such policies interact with well-established social, cultural and biological differences in how men and women perceive, relate to and use alcohol, and with wider inequalities, in ways which may give rise to gender differences in policy effectiveness.  Aims: To examine the extent to which gender-specific data and analyses were considered in, and are available from, systematic reviews of population-level alcohol policy interventions, and where possible, to conduct a narrative synthesis of relevant data.  Methods: A prior systematic ‘review of reviews’ of population level alcohol interventions 2002-2012 was updated to May 2014, all gender-relevant data extracted, and the level and quality of gender reporting assessed. A narrative synthesis of extracted findings was conducted.  Results: Sixty-three systematic reviews, covering ten policy areas, were included. Five reviews (8%) consistently provided information on baseline participation by gender for each individual study in the review and twenty-nine (46%) reported some gender-specific information on the impact of the policies under consideration. Specific findings include evidence of possible gender differences in the impact of and exposure to alcohol marketing, and a failure to consider potential unintended consequences and harm to others in most reviews.  Conclusions: Gender is poorly reported in systematic reviews of population-level interventions to reduce alcohol-related harm, hindering assessment of the intended and unintended effects of such policies on women and men.
Type: Journal Article
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Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Fitzgerald, N., Angus, K., Emslie, C., Shipton, D., and Bauld, L. (2016) Gender differences in the impact of population-level alcohol policy interventions: evidence synthesis of systematic reviews. Addiction, 111: 1735–1747. doi: 10.1111/add.13452, which has been published in final form at This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.
Affiliation: Institute for Social Marketing
Institute for Social Marketing
Glasgow Caledonian University
NHS Health Scotland
Institute for Social Marketing

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