Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/23174
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Social Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Coding the biodigital child: the biopolitics and pedagogic strategies of educational data science
Authors: Williamson, Ben
Contact Email: ben.williamson@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Biopolitics
digital data
educational data science
neuroscience
psychology
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Taylor and Francis
Citation: Williamson B (2016) Coding the biodigital child: the biopolitics and pedagogic strategies of educational data science, Pedagogy, Culture and Society, 24 (3), pp. 401-416.
Abstract: Educational data science is an emerging transdisciplinary field formed from an amalgamation of data science and elements of biological, psychological and neuroscientific knowledge about learning, or learning science. This article conceptualises educational data science as a biopolitical strategy focused on the evaluation and management of the corporeal, emotional and embrained lives of children. Such strategies are enacted through the development of new kinds of digitally-mediated ‘biopedagogies’ of body optimisation, ‘psychopedagogies’ of emotional maximisation, and ‘neuropedagogies’ of brain empowerment. The data practices, scientific knowledges, digital devices and pedagogies that constitute educational data science produce new systems of knowledge about the child that are consequential to their formation as ‘biodigital’ subjects, whose assumed qualities and capacities are defined through expert practices of biosensing, emotion analytics, and neurocomputation, combined with associated scientific knowledges. The article develops the concept of transcoding to account for the processes involved in the formation of the biodigital child.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/23174
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14681366.2016.1175499
Rights: © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Affiliation: Education



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