Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/23099
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Relationship between e-cigarette point of sale recall and e-cigarette use in secondary school children: a cross-sectional study
Authors: Best, Catherine
Haseen, Farhana
van, der Sluijs Winfried
Ozakinci, Gozde
Currie, Dorothy
Eadie, Douglas
Stead, Martine
MacKintosh, Anne Marie
Pearce, Jamie
Tisch, Catherine
MacGregor, Andy
Amos, Amanda
Frank, John W
Haw, Sally
Contact Email: catherine.best2@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: E-cigarettes
Vaping
Adolescents
Advertising
Point of sale display
Smoking
Tobacco control
Issue Date: 14-Apr-2016
Publisher: BioMed Central
Citation: Best C, Haseen F, van der Sluijs W, Ozakinci G, Currie D, Eadie D, Stead M, MacKintosh AM, Pearce J, Tisch C, MacGregor A, Amos A, Frank JW & Haw S (2016) Relationship between e-cigarette point of sale recall and e-cigarette use in secondary school children: a cross-sectional study, BMC Public Health, 16, Art. No.: 310.
Abstract: Background  There has been a rapid increase in the retail availability of e-cigarettes in the UK and elsewhere. It is known that exposure to cigarette point-of-sale (POS) displays influences smoking behaviour and intentions in young people. However, there is as yet no evidence regarding the relationship between e-cigarette POS display exposure and e-cigarette use in young people.  Methods  This cross sectional survey was conducted in four high schools in Scotland. A response rate of 87% and a total sample of 3808 was achieved. Analysis was by logistic regression on e-cigarette outcomes with standard errors adjusted for clustering within schools. The logistic regression models were adjusted for recall of other e-cigarette adverts, smoking status, and demographic variables. Multiple chained imputation was employed to assess the consistency of the findings across different methods of handling missing data.  Results  Adolescents who recalled seeing e-cigarettes in small shops were more likely to have tried an e-cigarette (OR 1.92 99% CI 1.61 to 2.29). Adolescents who recalled seeing e-cigarettes for sale in small shops (OR 1.80 99% CI 1.08 to 2.99) or supermarkets (OR 1.70 99% CI 1.22 to 2.36) were more likely to intend to try them in the next 6months.  Conclusions  This study has found a cross-sectional association between self-reported recall of e-cigarette POS displays and use of, and intention to use, e-cigarettes. The magnitude of this association is comparable to that between tobacco point of sale recall and intention to use traditional cigarettes in the same sample. Further longitudinal data is required to confirm a causal relationship between e-cigarette point of sale exposure and their use and future use by young people.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/23099
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12889-016-2968-2
Rights: © Best et al. 2016 This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​4.​0/​), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://​creativecommons.​org/​publicdomain/​zero/​1.​0/​) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Affiliation: HS Research - Stirling
HS Research - Stirling
University of St Andrews
University of St Andrews
University of St Andrews
Institute for Social Marketing
Institute for Social Marketing
Institute for Social Marketing
University of Edinburgh
University of Edinburgh
Scottish Centre For Social Research
University of Edinburgh
University of Edinburgh
HS Research - Stirling

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