Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/23063
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Social Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Spotlight on Scotland: Assets and opportunities for aging research in a shifting sociopolitical landscape (Forthcoming/Available Online)
Authors: Robertson, Jane
Bowes, Alison
Gibson, Grant
McCabe, Louise
Reynish, Emma
Rutherford, Alasdair
Wilinska, Monika
Contact Email: j.m.robertson@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: ageing
care
dementia
demography
diversity and ethnicity
public policy
technology
Issue Date: 6-Apr-2016
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Citation: Robertson J, Bowes A, Gibson G, McCabe L, Reynish E, Rutherford A & Wilinska M Spotlight on Scotland: Assets and opportunities for aging research in a shifting sociopolitical landscape (Forthcoming/Available Online), Gerontologist.
Abstract: Scotland is a small nation, yet it leads the field in key areas of aging research. With the creation of a devolved government with authority over health and social services, the country has witnessed practice and policy developments that offer distinctive opportunities for innovative research. With multidisciplinary groups of internationally recognized researchers, Scotland is able to take advantage of a unique set of opportunities for aging research: a well-profiled population brings opportunities in population data and linkage to understand people’s interactions with health, social care, and other public services; while research on technology and telecare is a distinctive area where Scotland is recognized internationally for using technology to develop effective, high-quality and well-accepted services at relatively low financial cost. The paper also considers free personal care for older people and the national dementia strategy in Scotland. The potential to evaluate the impact of free personal care will provide valuable information for other global health and social care systems. Exploring the impact of the national dementia strategy is another unique area of research that can advance understanding in relation to quality of life and the development of services. The paper concludes that, while Scotland benefits from unique opportunities for progressive public policy and innovative aging research that will provide valuable lessons at the forefront of a globally aging population, the challenges associated with an aging population and increasing cultural diversity must be acknowledged and addressed to ensure that the vision of equality and social justice for all is realized.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/23063
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/geront/gnw058
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Dementia Studies
Faculty of Social Sciences
Dementia Studies
Dementia Studies
Dementia Studies
Sociology/Social Pol&Criminology
Sociology/Social Pol&Criminology

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