Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/23006
Appears in Collections:Economics Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Migration and fiscal policy as factors explaining the labour-market resilience of UK regions to the Great Recession
Authors: Bell, David
Eiser, David
Contact Email: david.eiser@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: regional resilience
recession
unemployment
migration
Issue Date: Mar-2016
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Citation: Bell D & Eiser D (2016) Migration and fiscal policy as factors explaining the labour-market resilience of UK regions to the Great Recession, Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, 9 (1), pp. 197-215.
Abstract: London has been at the vanguard of the UK’s recovery from recession, recovering its pre-recession levels of output and employment more rapidly than other regions. A large part of London’s stronger recovery can be explained by increased employment and reduced inactivity among overseas-born immigrants. Furthermore, net outmigration from London to other UK regions fell during the recession, and is only beginning to return to previous levels. Both factors have increased labour supply and may have contributed to more marked real wage falls in London than in other regions. Fiscal austerity may have accentuated the spatial pattern of the UK’s recovery.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/23006
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/cjres/rsv029
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Economics
Economics

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