Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/2259
Appears in Collections:History and Politics Research Reports
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: SNH Commissioned Report 313: Literature review of the history of grassland management in Scotland
Authors: Ross, Alasdair
Contact Email: ar26@stir.ac.uk
Citation: Ross A (2008) SNH Commissioned Report 313: Literature review of the history of grassland management in Scotland. MacKintosh Jane (ed.). Commissioned Report, 313. Scottish Natural Heritage.
Keywords: Grasslands
Meadows
Scotland
Britain
Shielings
Issue Date: 2008
Publisher: Scottish Natural Heritage
Series/Report no.: Commissioned Report, 313
Abstract: The biodiversity of semi-natural grasslands (also known as unimproved grasslands) is a product of their past low-intensity agricultural management. Current knowledge of appropriate management for these species-rich pastures and meadows is often based on assumptions of the types of management in the past that created and maintained them. This project provides evidence from historical records to support SNH’s advice on the status and management of unimproved lowland grasslands. It describes the typical grassland management regimes of the past three centuries, looking at hay production and grazings, and at past methods of improvement and fertilisation. It shows which types of grassland were valued and which were considered undesirable, and thus how past grassland management has shaped the modern resourc
Description: Scottish Natural Heritage
Type: Research Report
URL: http://www.snh.org.uk/pubs/detail.asp?id=1456
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/2259
Rights: The publisher has granted permission for use of this report in this Repository. The report, SNH Commissioned Report 313: Literature review of the history of grassland management in Scotland, was first published by Scottish Natural Heritage.
Affiliation: History

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