Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22387
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: A qualitative evidence synthesis on the management of male obesity
Authors: Archibald, Daryll
Douglas, Flora
Hoddinott, Pat
van, Teijlingen Edwin
Stewart, Fiona
Robertson, Clare
Boyers, Dwayne
Avenell, Alison
Contact Email: p.m.hoddinott@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Oct-2015
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
Citation: Archibald D, Douglas F, Hoddinott P, van Teijlingen E, Stewart F, Robertson C, Boyers D & Avenell A (2015) A qualitative evidence synthesis on the management of male obesity, BMJ Open, 5, Art. No.: e008372.
Abstract: Objectives: To investigate what weight management interventions work for men, with which men, and under what circumstances.  Design: Realist synthesis of qualitative studies.  Data sources: Sensitive searches of 11 electronic databases from 1990 to 2012 supplemented by grey literature searches.  Study selection: Studies published between 1990 and 2012 reporting qualitative research with obese men, or obese men in contrast to obese women and lifestyle or drug weight management were included. The studies included men aged 16 years or over, with no upper age limit, with a mean or median body mass index of 30 kg/m2in all settings.  Results: 22 studies were identified, including 5 qualitative studies linked to randomised controlled trials of weight maintenance interventions and 8 qualitative studies linked to non-randomised intervention studies, and 9 relevant UK-based qualitative studies not linked to any intervention. Health concerns and the perception that certain programmes had ‘worked’ for other men were the key factors that motivated men to engage with weight management programmes. Barriers to engagement and adherence with programmes included: men not problematising their weight until labelled ‘obese’; a lack of support for new food choices by friends and family, and reluctance to undertake extreme dieting. Retaining some autonomy over what is eaten; flexibility about treats and alcohol, and a focus on physical activity were attractive features of programmes. Group interventions, humour and social support facilitated attendance and adherence. Men were motivated to attend programmes in settings that were convenient, non-threatening and congruent with their masculine identities, but men were seldom involved in programme design.  Conclusions: Men's perspectives and preferences within the wider context of family, work and pleasure should be sought when designing weight management services. Qualitative research is needed with men to inform all aspects of intervention design, including the setting, optimal recruitment processes and strategies to minimise attrition.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22387
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008372
Rights: This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt and build upon this work, for commercial use, provided the original work is properly cited. See: http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Affiliation: Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research & Policy
University of Aberdeen
HS Research - Stirling
Bournemouth University
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen

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