Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22385
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Sedentary time in adults and the association with diabetes, cardiovascular disease and death: systematic review and meta-analysis
Authors: Wilmot, Emma G
Edwardson, Charlotte L
Achana, Felix A
Davies, Melanie J
Gorely, Trish
Gray, Laura J
Khunti, Kamlesh
Yates, Thomas
Biddle, Stuart J H
Contact Email: trish.gorely@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Cardiovascular
Diabetes
Meta-analysis
Mortality
Sedentary
Systematic review
Issue Date: Nov-2012
Publisher: Springer
Citation: Wilmot EG, Edwardson CL, Achana FA, Davies MJ, Gorely T, Gray LJ, Khunti K, Yates T & Biddle SJH (2012) Sedentary time in adults and the association with diabetes, cardiovascular disease and death: systematic review and meta-analysis, Diabetologia, 55 (11), pp. 2895-2905.
Abstract: Aims/hypothesis: Sedentary (sitting) behaviours are ubiquitous in modern society. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the association of sedentary time with diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. Methods: Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library databases were searched for terms related to sedentary time and health outcomes. Cross-sectional and prospective studies were included. RR/HR and 95% CIs were extracted by two independent reviewers. Data were adjusted for baseline event rate and pooled using a random-effects model. Bayesian predictive effects and intervals were calculated to indicate the variance in outcomes that would be expected if new studies were conducted in the future. Results: Eighteen studies (16 prospective, two cross-sectional) were included, with 794,577 participants. Fifteen of these studies were moderate to high quality. The greatest sedentary time compared with the lowest was associated with a 112% increase in the RR of diabetes (RR 2.12; 95% credible interval [CrI] 1.61, 2.78), a 147% increase in the RR of cardiovascular events (RR 2.47; 95% CI 1.44, 4.24), a 90% increase in the risk of cardiovascular mortality (HR 1.90; 95% CrI 1.36, 2.66) and a 49% increase in the risk of all-cause mortality (HR 1.49; 95% CrI 1.14, 2.03). The predictive effects and intervals were only significant for diabetes. Conclusions/interpretation: Sedentary time is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality; the strength of the association is most consistent for diabetes.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22385
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00125-012-2677-z
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: University of Leicester
Loughborough University
University of Leicester
University of Leicester
Sport
University of Leicester
University of Leicester
University of Leicester
Loughborough University

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