Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22352
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Social Sciences Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Frequency, prevalence, incidence and risk factors associated with visual hallucinations in a sample of patients with Parkinson's Disease: a longitudinal 4-year study
Authors: Gibson, Grant
Mottram, Pat
Burn, David
Hindle, John
Landau, Sabine
Mike, Samuel
Hurt, Catherine
Brown, Richard
Wilson, Ken
Contact Email: grant.gibson@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Parkinson's disease
visual hallucinations
frequency
prevalence
incidence
Issue Date: Jun-2013
Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell
Citation: Gibson G, Mottram P, Burn D, Hindle J, Landau S, Mike S, Hurt C, Brown R & Wilson K (2013) Frequency, prevalence, incidence and risk factors associated with visual hallucinations in a sample of patients with Parkinson's Disease: a longitudinal 4-year study, International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 28 (6), pp. 626-631.
Abstract: Objective: To examine the prevalence, incidence and risk factors associated with visual hallucinations (VHs) amongst people suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods: We recruited 513 patients with PD from movement disorder and PD clinics within three sites in the UK. Patients were interviewed using a series of standardised clinical rating scales at baseline, 12, 24 and 36 months. Data relating to VHs were collected using the North-East Visual Hallucinations Interview. Prevalence rates for VHs at each assessment were recorded. Associations were determined using multiple regression analysis. Results: Cross-sectional prevalence rates for VHs at baseline, 12, 24 and 36 months indicated VHs in approximately 50% of patients. A cumulative frequency of 82.7% of cases at the end of the study period exhibited VHs. The incidence rate for VHs was 457 cases per 1000 population. Longer disease duration, greater impairment in activities of daily living and higher rates of anxiety were most commonly associated with VHs. No factors predictive of VHs could be ascertained. Conclusions: When examined longitudinally, VHs affect more patients than is commonly assumed in cross-sectional prevalence studies. Clinicians should routinely screen for VHs throughout the disease course. Disease duration, impairment in activities of daily living and anxiety presented as co-morbidities associated with VHs in PD, and therefore those presenting with VHs should be screened for anxiety disorder and vice versa.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22352
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/gps.3869
Rights: The publisher does not allow this work to be made publicly available in this Repository. Please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study.
Affiliation: Dementia Studies
University of Liverpool
Newcastle University
Bangor University
King's College London
City University London
University of Manchester
King's College London
University of Liverpool

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Gibson_et_al-2013-International_Journal_of_Geriatric_Psychiatry.pdf113.26 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 31/12/2999     Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependant on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.

This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.