Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22066
Appears in Collections:Aquaculture Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Evaluation of a high-EPA oil from transgenic Camelina sativa in feeds for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.): Effects on tissue fatty acid composition, histology and gene expression
Authors: Betancor, Monica
Sprague, Matthew
Sayanova, Olga
Usher, Sarah
Campbell, Patrick
Napier, Johnathan A
Caballero, Maria Jose
Tocher, Douglas R
Contact Email: drt1@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: EPA
Camelina
Aquaculture
Fish oil
Pyloric caeca
microarray
Issue Date: 1-Jul-2015
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Betancor M, Sprague M, Sayanova O, Usher S, Campbell P, Napier JA, Caballero MJ & Tocher DR (2015) Evaluation of a high-EPA oil from transgenic Camelina sativa in feeds for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.): Effects on tissue fatty acid composition, histology and gene expression, Aquaculture, 444, pp. 1-12.
Abstract: Currently, one alternative for dietary fish oil (FO) in aquafeeds is vegetable oils (VO) that are devoid of omega-3 (n-3) long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs). Entirely new sources of n-3 LC-PUFA such as eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids through de novo production are a potential solution to fill the gap between supply and demand of these important nutrients. Camelina sativa was metabolically engineered to produce a seed oil (ECO) with N20% EPA and its potential to substitute for FO in Atlantic salmon feeds was tested. Fish were fed with one of the three experimental diets containing FO, wild-type camelina oil (WCO) or ECO as the sole lipid sources for 7 weeks. Inclusion of ECO did not affect any of the performance parameters studied and enhanced apparent digestibility of individual n-6 and n-3 PUFA compared to dietaryWCO. High levels of EPA were maintained in brain, liver and intestine (pyloric caeca), and levels of DPA and DHA were increased in liver and intestine of fish fed ECO compared to fish fed WCO likely due to increased LC-PUFA biosynthesis based on up-regulation of the genes. Fish fed ECO showed slight lipid accumulation within hepatocytes similar to that with WCO, although not significantly different to fish fed FO. The regulation of a small number of genes could be attributed to the specific effect of ECO (311 features) with metabolismbeing the most affected category. The EPA oil from transgenic Camelina (ECO) could be used as a substitute for FO, however it is a hybrid oil containing both FO (EPA) and VO (18:2n-6) fatty acid signatures that resulted in similarly mixed metabolic and physiological responses.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22066
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aquaculture.2015.03.020
Rights: This article is open-access. Open access publishing allows free access to and distribution of published articles where the author retains copyright of their work by employing a Creative Commons attribution licence. Proper attribution of authorship and correct citation details should be given.
Affiliation: Aquaculture
Aquaculture
Rothamsted Research
Rothamsted Research
BioMar U.K.
Rothamsted Research
Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria
Aquaculture

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