Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22011
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: A systematic review of the cost-effectiveness of non-surgical obesity interventions in men
Authors: Boyers, Dwayne
Avenell, Alison
Stewart, Fiona
Robertson, Clare
Archibald, Daryll
Douglas, Flora
Hoddinott, Pat
van, Teijlingen Edwin
Contact Email: p.m.hoddinott@stir.ac.uk
Keywords: Obesity treatment
Men's health
Cost-effectiveness
Decision analysis
Issue Date: Jul-2015
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Boyers D, Avenell A, Stewart F, Robertson C, Archibald D, Douglas F, Hoddinott P & van Teijlingen E (2015) A systematic review of the cost-effectiveness of non-surgical obesity interventions in men, Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 9 (4), pp. 310-327.
Abstract: Background: Increasing obesity related health conditions have a substantial burden on population health and healthcare spending. Obesity may have a sex-specific impact on disease development, men and women may respond differently to interventions, and there may be sex-specific differences to the cost-effectiveness of interventions to address obesity. There is no clear indication of cost-effective treatments for men. Methods: This systematic review summarises the literature reporting the cost-effectiveness of non-surgical weight-management interventions for men. Studies were quality assessed against a checklist for appraising decision modelling studies. Results: Although none of the included studies explicitly set out to determine the cost-effectiveness of treatment for men, seven studies reported results for subgroups of men. Interventions were grouped into lifestyle interventions (five studies) and Orlistat (two studies). The retrieved studies showed promising evidence of cost-effectiveness, especially when interventions were targeted at high-risk groups, such as those with impaired glucose tolerance. There appears to be some sex-specific elements to cost-effectiveness, however, there were no clear trends or indications of what may be contributing to this. Conclusion: The economic evidence was highly uncertain, and limited by variable methodological quality of the included studies. It was therefore not possible to draw strong conclusions on cost-effectiveness. Future studies are required to demonstrate the cost-effectiveness of interventions specifically targeted towards weight loss for men.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/22011
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.orcp.2015.03.001
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Accepted refereed manuscript of: Boyers D, Avenell A, Stewart F, Robertson C, Archibald D, Douglas F, Hoddinott P & van Teijlingen E (2015) A systematic review of the cost-effectiveness of non-surgical obesity interventions in men, Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 9(4), pp. 310-327. DOI: 10.1016/j.orcp.2015.03.001 © 2015, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution- NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Affiliation: University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
HS Research - Stirling
Bournemouth University

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