Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21997
Appears in Collections:Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Journal Articles
Peer Review Status: Refereed
Title: Should weight loss and maintenance programmes be designed differently for men? A systematic review of long-term randomised controlled trials presenting data for men and women: The ROMEO Project
Authors: Robertson, Clare
Avenell, Alison
Boachie, Charles
Stewart, Fiona
Archibald, Daryll
Douglas, Flora
Hoddinott, Pat
van, Teijlingen Edwin
Boyers, Dwayne
Contact Email: p.m.hoddinott@stir.ac.uk
Issue Date: Feb-2016
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Robertson C, Avenell A, Boachie C, Stewart F, Archibald D, Douglas F, Hoddinott P, van Teijlingen E & Boyers D (2016) Should weight loss and maintenance programmes be designed differently for men? A systematic review of long-term randomised controlled trials presenting data for men and women: The ROMEO Project, Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 10 (1), pp. 70-84.
Abstract: We systematically reviewed the randomised controlled trial (RCT) evidence for long-term (≥12 months) weight management interventions for obese men in contrast to women to help understand whether programmes should be designed differently for men. We searched 11 databases up to October 2014. Twenty-two RCTs reported data separately for men and women in weight loss or weight maintenance interventions. We found men were under-represented in RCTs of weight loss interventions open to both sexes. Men comprised 36% of participants (4771 from 13,305 participants). Despite this, men were 11% (95% CI 8-14%, p < 0.001) more likely to be trial completers compared to women. The trials did not report service user consultation and none were designed to investigate whether men and women responded differently to given interventions. Our meta-analysis of 13 trials showed no significant difference in weight loss between men and women, either for weight loss in kg (p = 0.90) or percentage weight loss (p = 0.78), although men tended to lose more weight with intensive low fat reducing diets, with or without meal replacements, and structured physical activity/exercise programmes than women. Orlistat was less beneficial for men for weight maintenance. Individual support and tailoring appeared more helpful for men than women. We found evidence that men and women respond differently to, and have different preferences for, varying types of weight management programme. We suggest that it is important to understand men's views on weight loss, as this is likely to also improve the uptake and effectiveness of programmes for men.
Type: Journal Article
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/1893/21997
DOI Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.orcp.2015.04.005
Rights: This item has been embargoed for a period. During the embargo please use the Request a Copy feature at the foot of the Repository record to request a copy directly from the author. You can only request a copy if you wish to use this work for your own research or private study. Accepted refereed manuscript of: Robertson C, Avenell A, Boachie C, Stewart F, Archibald D, Douglas F, Hoddinott P, van Teijlingen E & Boyers D (2016) Should weight loss and maintenance programmes be designed differently for men? A systematic review of long-term randomised controlled trials presenting data for men and women: The ROMEO Project, Obesity Research and Clinical Practice, 10 (1), pp. 70-84. DOI: 10.1016/j.orcp.2015.04.005 © 2016, Elsevier. Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Affiliation: University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
University of Glasgow
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
University of Aberdeen
HS Research - Stirling
Bournemouth University
University of Aberdeen

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Obes Research Clin Practice V2 for MUPPET.pdf326.72 kBAdobe PDFUnder Embargo until 1/2/2017     Request a copy

Note: If any of the files in this item are currently embargoed, you can request a copy directly from the author by clicking the padlock icon above. However, this facility is dependant on the depositor still being contactable at their original email address.

This item is protected by original copyright



Items in the Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

If you believe that any material held in STORRE infringes copyright, please contact library@stir.ac.uk providing details and we will remove the Work from public display in STORRE and investigate your claim.